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Title: FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report

Abstract

Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];
  1. (Amy)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908205
Report Number(s):
PNNL-16319
NN2001000; TRN: US200722%%548
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; CHALCOGENIDES; DEPOSITION; DESIGN; FABRICATION; GLASS; LASERS; MINIATURIZATION; MODULATION; OPTICAL FIBERS; OPTICS; PROCESSING; PROLIFERATION; SAMPLING; STABILITY; Chalcogenide glass; Infrared Photonics; Quantum Cascade Lasers

Citation Formats

Anheier, Norman C., Allen, Paul J., Bernacki, Bruce E., Ho, Nicolas, Krishnaswami, Kannan, Qiao, Hong, and Schultz, John F.. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/908205.
Anheier, Norman C., Allen, Paul J., Bernacki, Bruce E., Ho, Nicolas, Krishnaswami, Kannan, Qiao, Hong, & Schultz, John F.. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/908205.
Anheier, Norman C., Allen, Paul J., Bernacki, Bruce E., Ho, Nicolas, Krishnaswami, Kannan, Qiao, Hong, and Schultz, John F.. Thu . "FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/908205. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908205.
@article{osti_908205,
title = {FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report},
author = {Anheier, Norman C. and Allen, Paul J. and Bernacki, Bruce E. and Ho, Nicolas and Krishnaswami, Kannan and Qiao, Hong and Schultz, John F.},
abstractNote = {Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.},
doi = {10.2172/908205},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capablemore » of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions. During FY 2005, PNNL’s Infrared Photonics research team made measurable progress exploiting the extraordinary optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to develop miniaturized integrated optics for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. We investigated sulfur purification methods that will eventually lead to routine production of optical quality chalcogenide glass. We also discovered a glass degradation phenomenon and our investigation uncovered the underlying surface chemistry mechanism and developed mitigation actions. Key research was performed to understand and control the photomodification properties. This research was then used to demonstrate several essential infrared photonic devices, including LWIR single-mode waveguide devices and waveguide couplers. Optical metrology tools were also developed to characterize optical waveguide structures and LWIR optical components.« less
  • Through the duration of the NNSA Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and development (NA-22) ITAS lifecycle project, the Infrared Photonics research has been focused on developing integrated quantum cascade (QC) laser technology to enable next-generation remote sensing designs. Our team developed the concept of the integrated QC laser transmitter and originated and promoted the vision of mid-infrared (3–12 μm) wavelength photonics. Sustained NA-22 project funding produced the QC laser transmitter that is now deployed in follow-on projects. Our team produced nationally recognized cutting-edge research in the area of infrared transparent chalcogenide photonics. Three technical staff were recruited from outside PNNLmore » and hired to support this research. This project also supported student research at the national laboratory, including high school, undergraduate, and graduate students. This provided a derivative benefit to NA-22, PNNL, and the educational institutions through training and mentoring next-generation students in science and technology. The student support was also the catalyst to develop research collaborations with two universities that are internationally recognized for their chalcogenide glass research.« less
  • Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at PNNL is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for the MWIR and LWIR by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin film deposition capabilities, direct-laser writing techniques, IR photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology - all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for amore » variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.« less
  • Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methodsmore » for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.« less
  • This report summarizes the work conducted for the Z-inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) late start Laboratory Directed Research Project. A major area of focus was on creating a roadmap to a z-pinch driven fusion power plant. The roadmap ties ZIFE into the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative through the use of high energy fusion neutrons to burn the actinides of spent fuel waste. Transmutation presents a near term use for Z-IFE technology and will aid in paving the path to fusion energy. The work this year continued to develop the science and engineering needed to support the Z-IFE roadmap. Thismore » included plant system and driver cost estimates, recyclable transmission line studies, flibe characterization, reaction chamber design, and shock mitigation techniques.« less