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Title: On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water

Abstract

Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Cooperative Research andDevelopment Agreement. Joint Industry Program, National EnergyTechnologies Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
908168
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59225
Journal ID: ISSN 0099-0094; ENGEDC; R&D Project: G20401; TRN: US200722%%514
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 12 April2006; Journal ID: ISSN 0099-0094
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; BUBBLES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; SEDIMENTS; SOLUBILITY; STORAGE; SURFACE WATERS; TRANSPORT; VELOCITY; Ebullition CO2 storage Leakage Seepage Bubble flow

Citation Formats

Oldenburg, C M, and Lewicki, J L. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Oldenburg, C M, & Lewicki, J L. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water. United States.
Oldenburg, C M, and Lewicki, J L. Fri . "On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water". United States.
@article{osti_908168,
title = {On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water},
author = {Oldenburg, C M and Lewicki, J L},
abstractNote = {Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.},
doi = {},
journal = {Environmental Geology},
issn = {0099-0094},
number = 5,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {10}
}