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Title: FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering

Abstract

This is the final report for LDRD 01-ERD-005. The Principle Investigator was Robert Sharpe. Collaborators included Niel Madsen, Benjamin Fasenfest, John D. Rockway, of the Defense Sciences Engineering Division (DSED), Vikram Jandhyala and James Pingenot from the University of Washington, and Mark Stowell of the Center for Applications Development and Software Engineering (CADSE). It should be noted that Benjamin Fasenfest and Mark Stowell were partially supported under other funding. The purpose of this LDRD effort was to enhance LLNL's computational electromagnetics capability in the area of broadband radiation and scattering. For radiation and scattering problems our transient EM codes are limited by the approximate Radiation Boundary Conditions (RBC's) used to model the radiation into an infinite space. Improved RBC's were researched, developed, and incorporated into the existing EMSolve finite-element code to provide a 10-100x improvement in the accuracy of the boundary conditions. Section I provides an introduction to the project and the project goals. Section II provides a summary of the project's research and accomplishments as presented in the attached papers.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908122
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-229094
TRN: US200722%%482
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; ACCURACY; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; RADIATIONS; SCATTERING; TRANSIENTS; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY

Citation Formats

Madsen, N, Fasenfest, B, White, D, Stowell, M, Sharpe, R, Jandhyala, V, Champagne, N, Rockway, J D, and Pingenot, J. FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/908122.
Madsen, N, Fasenfest, B, White, D, Stowell, M, Sharpe, R, Jandhyala, V, Champagne, N, Rockway, J D, & Pingenot, J. FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering. United States. doi:10.2172/908122.
Madsen, N, Fasenfest, B, White, D, Stowell, M, Sharpe, R, Jandhyala, V, Champagne, N, Rockway, J D, and Pingenot, J. Thu . "FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering". United States. doi:10.2172/908122. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908122.
@article{osti_908122,
title = {FY06 LDRD Final Report: Broadband Radiation and Scattering},
author = {Madsen, N and Fasenfest, B and White, D and Stowell, M and Sharpe, R and Jandhyala, V and Champagne, N and Rockway, J D and Pingenot, J},
abstractNote = {This is the final report for LDRD 01-ERD-005. The Principle Investigator was Robert Sharpe. Collaborators included Niel Madsen, Benjamin Fasenfest, John D. Rockway, of the Defense Sciences Engineering Division (DSED), Vikram Jandhyala and James Pingenot from the University of Washington, and Mark Stowell of the Center for Applications Development and Software Engineering (CADSE). It should be noted that Benjamin Fasenfest and Mark Stowell were partially supported under other funding. The purpose of this LDRD effort was to enhance LLNL's computational electromagnetics capability in the area of broadband radiation and scattering. For radiation and scattering problems our transient EM codes are limited by the approximate Radiation Boundary Conditions (RBC's) used to model the radiation into an infinite space. Improved RBC's were researched, developed, and incorporated into the existing EMSolve finite-element code to provide a 10-100x improvement in the accuracy of the boundary conditions. Section I provides an introduction to the project and the project goals. Section II provides a summary of the project's research and accomplishments as presented in the attached papers.},
doi = {10.2172/908122},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 08 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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