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Title: Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds

Abstract

We describe preliminary results of a global model of the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1. The full model combines FLASH hydrodynamic calculations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present maps of the density, temperature, velocity, and ionization parameter from a FLASH two-dimensional time-dependent simulation of Vela X-1, as well as maps of the emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908113
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-229626
TRN: US200722%%438
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: The Extreme Universe in the Suzaku Era, Kyoto, Japan, Dec 04 - Dec 08, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; EMISSIVITY; HYDRODYNAMICS; IONIZATION; PHOTOIONIZATION; RADIATION TRANSPORT; SIMULATION; UNIVERSE; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Mauche, C W, Liedahl, D A, Akiyama, S, and Plewa, T. Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Mauche, C W, Liedahl, D A, Akiyama, S, & Plewa, T. Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds. United States.
Mauche, C W, Liedahl, D A, Akiyama, S, and Plewa, T. Fri . "Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908113.
@article{osti_908113,
title = {Hydrodynamic and Spectral Simulations of HMXB Winds},
author = {Mauche, C W and Liedahl, D A and Akiyama, S and Plewa, T},
abstractNote = {We describe preliminary results of a global model of the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1. The full model combines FLASH hydrodynamic calculations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present maps of the density, temperature, velocity, and ionization parameter from a FLASH two-dimensional time-dependent simulation of Vela X-1, as well as maps of the emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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