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Title: Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution

Abstract

Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908094
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-228085
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951; APPLAB; TRN: US200722%%420
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters, vol. 90, N/A, March 12, 2007, pp. 114101; Journal Volume: 90
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHEMISTRY; CURRENT DENSITY; ELECTRONS; RESOLUTION; TIME RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Armstrong, M R, Reed, B W, Torralva, B R, and Browning, N D. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2712838.
Armstrong, M R, Reed, B W, Torralva, B R, & Browning, N D. Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2712838.
Armstrong, M R, Reed, B W, Torralva, B R, and Browning, N D. 2007. "Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2712838. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908094.
@article{osti_908094,
title = {Prospects for Electron Imaging with Ultrafast Time Resolution},
author = {Armstrong, M R and Reed, B W and Torralva, B R and Browning, N D},
abstractNote = {Many pivotal aspects of material science, biomechanics, and chemistry would benefit from nanometer imaging with ultrafast time resolution. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of short-pulse electron imaging with t10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution, sufficient to characterize phenomena that propagate at the speed of sound in materials (1-10 kilometer/second) without smearing. We outline resolution-degrading effects that occur at high current density followed by strategies to mitigate these effects. Finally, we present a model electron imaging system that achieves 10 nanometer/10 picosecond spatio-temporal resolution.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2712838},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters, vol. 90, N/A, March 12, 2007, pp. 114101},
number = ,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}
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