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Title: Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

Abstract

This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908077
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-7976
TRN: US200722%%186
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; ELECTRIC FIELDS; LIGHTNING; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; MINES; WEST VIRGINIA; FORECASTING; Lightning.; Electric fields-Measurement.; Coal mines and mining-Research.; Electromagnetic measurements.

Citation Formats

Morris, Marvin E., and Higgins, Matthew B.. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/908077.
Morris, Marvin E., & Higgins, Matthew B.. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.. United States. doi:10.2172/908077.
Morris, Marvin E., and Higgins, Matthew B.. Sun . "Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.". United States. doi:10.2172/908077. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908077.
@article{osti_908077,
title = {Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.},
author = {Morris, Marvin E. and Higgins, Matthew B.},
abstractNote = {This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.},
doi = {10.2172/908077},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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