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Title: MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.

Abstract

This guide is intended to enable researchers working with seismic data, but lacking backgrounds in computer science and programming, to develop seismic algorithms using the MATLAB-based MatSeis software. Specifically, it presents a series of step-by-step instructions to write four specific functions of increasing complexity, while simultaneously explaining the notation, syntax, and general program design of the functions being written. The ultimate goal is that that the user can use this guide as a jumping off point from which he or she can write new functions that are compatible with and expand the capabilities of the current MatSeis software that has been developed as part of the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEMRE) program at Sandia National Laboratories.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908062
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2735
TRN: US200722%%405
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTERS; DESIGN; MONITORING; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; PROGRAMMING; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SEISMIC DETECTION; Nuclear explosions.; Seismic waves-Data processing.; Application software.; Seismic prospecting-Simulation methods.

Citation Formats

McConnell, Lane Christopher, and Young, Christopher John. MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/908062.
McConnell, Lane Christopher, & Young, Christopher John. MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.. United States. doi:10.2172/908062.
McConnell, Lane Christopher, and Young, Christopher John. Tue . "MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.". United States. doi:10.2172/908062. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908062.
@article{osti_908062,
title = {MatSeis developer's guide:version 1.0.},
author = {McConnell, Lane Christopher and Young, Christopher John},
abstractNote = {This guide is intended to enable researchers working with seismic data, but lacking backgrounds in computer science and programming, to develop seismic algorithms using the MATLAB-based MatSeis software. Specifically, it presents a series of step-by-step instructions to write four specific functions of increasing complexity, while simultaneously explaining the notation, syntax, and general program design of the functions being written. The ultimate goal is that that the user can use this guide as a jumping off point from which he or she can write new functions that are compatible with and expand the capabilities of the current MatSeis software that has been developed as part of the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (GNEMRE) program at Sandia National Laboratories.},
doi = {10.2172/908062},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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