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Title: Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction

Abstract

Abstract--The purpose of this paper is to re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis as originally expressed by J.C.R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago. We describe this vision, place it in some historical context relating to the evolution of human factors research, and we observe that the field is now in the process of re-invigorating Licklider’s vision. We briefly assess the state of the technology within the context of contemporary theory and practice, and we describe what we regard as this emerging field of neo-symbiosis. We offer some initial thoughts on requirements to define functionality of neo-symbiotic systems and discuss research challenges associated with their development and evaluation.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
907935
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-47192
TRN: US200721%%468
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Cognitive Informatics and Natural Intelligence, 1(1):39-52; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS; HUMAN FACTORS; SYMBIOSIS; human-computer interaction; human-machine symbiosis; human factors; human information interaction

Citation Formats

Griffith, Douglas, and Greitzer, Frank L. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.4018/jcini.2007010103.
Griffith, Douglas, & Greitzer, Frank L. Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction. United States. doi:10.4018/jcini.2007010103.
Griffith, Douglas, and Greitzer, Frank L. Mon . "Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction". United States. doi:10.4018/jcini.2007010103.
@article{osti_907935,
title = {Neo-Symbiosis: The Next Stage in the Evolution of Human Information Interaction},
author = {Griffith, Douglas and Greitzer, Frank L.},
abstractNote = {Abstract--The purpose of this paper is to re-address the vision of human-computer symbiosis as originally expressed by J.C.R. Licklider nearly a half-century ago. We describe this vision, place it in some historical context relating to the evolution of human factors research, and we observe that the field is now in the process of re-invigorating Licklider’s vision. We briefly assess the state of the technology within the context of contemporary theory and practice, and we describe what we regard as this emerging field of neo-symbiosis. We offer some initial thoughts on requirements to define functionality of neo-symbiotic systems and discuss research challenges associated with their development and evaluation.},
doi = {10.4018/jcini.2007010103},
journal = {International Journal of Cognitive Informatics and Natural Intelligence, 1(1):39-52},
number = 1,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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