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Title: Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by using Organoclays

Abstract

We have studied the morphology of blends of PS/PMMA,PC/SAN24, and PMMA/EVA and compared the morphologies with and withoutmodified organoclay Cloisite 20A or Cloisite 6A clays. In each case wefound a large reduction in domains size and the localization of the clayplatelets along the interfaces of the components. The increasedmiscibility was accompanied in some cases, with the reduction of thesystem from multiple values of the glass transition temperatures to one.In addition, the modulus of all the systems increased significantly. Amodel was proposed where it was proposed that in-situ grafts were formingon the clay surfaces during blending and the grafts then had to belocalized at the interfaces. This blending mechanism reflects thecomposition of the blend and is fairly nonspecific. As a result, this maybe a promising technology for use in processing recycled blends where thecomposition is often uncertain and price is of generalconcern.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - StonyBrook/NY
OSTI Identifier:
907911
Report Number(s):
LBNL-61016
R&D Project: 356011; BnR: YN0100000; TRN: US0703346
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Macromolecules; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 14; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 06/14/2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75; 37; CLAYS; GLASS; MORPHOLOGY; POLYMERS; PRICES; PROCESSING; SOLUBILITY; TRANSITION TEMPERATURE; Polymer Blends Organoclays

Citation Formats

Si, Mayu, Araki, Tohru, Ade, Harald, Kilcoyne, A.L.D., Fischer,Robert, Sokolov, Jonathan C., and Rafailovich, Miriam H. Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by using Organoclays. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/ma060125+.
Si, Mayu, Araki, Tohru, Ade, Harald, Kilcoyne, A.L.D., Fischer,Robert, Sokolov, Jonathan C., & Rafailovich, Miriam H. Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by using Organoclays. United States. doi:10.1021/ma060125+.
Si, Mayu, Araki, Tohru, Ade, Harald, Kilcoyne, A.L.D., Fischer,Robert, Sokolov, Jonathan C., and Rafailovich, Miriam H. Tue . "Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by using Organoclays". United States. doi:10.1021/ma060125+.
@article{osti_907911,
title = {Compatibilizing Bulk Polymer Blends by using Organoclays},
author = {Si, Mayu and Araki, Tohru and Ade, Harald and Kilcoyne, A.L.D. and Fischer,Robert and Sokolov, Jonathan C. and Rafailovich, Miriam H.},
abstractNote = {We have studied the morphology of blends of PS/PMMA,PC/SAN24, and PMMA/EVA and compared the morphologies with and withoutmodified organoclay Cloisite 20A or Cloisite 6A clays. In each case wefound a large reduction in domains size and the localization of the clayplatelets along the interfaces of the components. The increasedmiscibility was accompanied in some cases, with the reduction of thesystem from multiple values of the glass transition temperatures to one.In addition, the modulus of all the systems increased significantly. Amodel was proposed where it was proposed that in-situ grafts were formingon the clay surfaces during blending and the grafts then had to belocalized at the interfaces. This blending mechanism reflects thecomposition of the blend and is fairly nonspecific. As a result, this maybe a promising technology for use in processing recycled blends where thecomposition is often uncertain and price is of generalconcern.},
doi = {10.1021/ma060125+},
journal = {Macromolecules},
number = 14,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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