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Title: METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX

Abstract

Waste in large waste boxes can generate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hydrogen. These waste boxes may or may not have flow paths out of them (although it is believed that most do). These boxes will be retrieved, sampled, and then coated with polyurea. After coating, filters will be installed in the box to keep the concentration of VOCs and hydrogen acceptably low. The MDSA requires that a vent path must be protected during application of the polyurea coating. If the box has been sampled then it is vented and the vent path must be protected. This report provides a model in which the user inputs the free volume of the waste box, sample concentration (ppm of total VOC or volume fraction hydrogen) along with the number of filters to be placed into the waste box lid. Using this information, the model provides an estimate of concentration vs. time or the number of filters needed to reduce the concentration by a specified fraction. If the equations from this report are placed into spreadsheets which are then used to demonstrate TSR compliance, the spreadsheets must come under the Software QA Plan for such documents. Chapters 2 and 3 present the theory.more » Chapter 4 presents the method with examples of its use found in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 provides the basis far the use of 1,000 ppm as the concentration below which the method is valid under any condition.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
907889
Report Number(s):
HNF-33512 Rev 0
TRN: US200721%%562
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; COMPLIANCE; HYDROGEN; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; VOLATILE MATTER; WASTES

Citation Formats

MARUSICH, R.M. METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/907889.
MARUSICH, R.M. METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX. United States. doi:10.2172/907889.
MARUSICH, R.M. Thu . "METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX". United States. doi:10.2172/907889. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/907889.
@article{osti_907889,
title = {METHODOLOGY FOR THE NUMBER OF FILTERS NEEDED IN A WASTE BOX},
author = {MARUSICH, R.M.},
abstractNote = {Waste in large waste boxes can generate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hydrogen. These waste boxes may or may not have flow paths out of them (although it is believed that most do). These boxes will be retrieved, sampled, and then coated with polyurea. After coating, filters will be installed in the box to keep the concentration of VOCs and hydrogen acceptably low. The MDSA requires that a vent path must be protected during application of the polyurea coating. If the box has been sampled then it is vented and the vent path must be protected. This report provides a model in which the user inputs the free volume of the waste box, sample concentration (ppm of total VOC or volume fraction hydrogen) along with the number of filters to be placed into the waste box lid. Using this information, the model provides an estimate of concentration vs. time or the number of filters needed to reduce the concentration by a specified fraction. If the equations from this report are placed into spreadsheets which are then used to demonstrate TSR compliance, the spreadsheets must come under the Software QA Plan for such documents. Chapters 2 and 3 present the theory. Chapter 4 presents the method with examples of its use found in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 provides the basis far the use of 1,000 ppm as the concentration below which the method is valid under any condition.},
doi = {10.2172/907889},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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