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Title: ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467

Abstract

Twelve LM-75 core samplers from Tank 28F sampling were received by SRNL for saltcake characterization. Of these, nine samplers contained mixtures of free liquid and saltcake, two contained only liquid, and one was empty. The saltcake contents generally appeared wet. A summary of the major tasks performed in this work are as follows: (1) Individual saltcake segments were extruded from the samplers and separated into saltcake and free liquid portions. (2) Free liquids were analyzed to estimate the amount of traced drill-string fluid contained in the samples. (3) The saltcake from each individual segment was homogenized, followed by analysis in duplicate. The analysis used more cost-effective and bounding radiochemical analyses rather than using the full Saltstone WAC suite. (4) A composite was created using an approximately equal percentage of each segment's saltcake contents. Supernatant liquid formed upon creation of the composite was decanted prior to use of the composite, but the composite was not drained. (5) A dissolution test was performed on the sample by contacting the composite with water at a 4:1 mass ratio of water to salt. The resulting soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed. Analysis focused on a large subset of the Saltstone WAC constituents.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
907768
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2006-00151
TRN: US0703353
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; SAMPLING; STORAGE FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; LIQUID WASTES; SALTS; PHASE STUDIES; MIXTURES; RADIOISOTOPES

Citation Formats

Martino, C, Daniel McCabe, D, Tommy Edwards, T, and Ralph Nichols, R. ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/907768.
Martino, C, Daniel McCabe, D, Tommy Edwards, T, & Ralph Nichols, R. ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467. United States. doi:10.2172/907768.
Martino, C, Daniel McCabe, D, Tommy Edwards, T, and Ralph Nichols, R. Wed . "ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467". United States. doi:10.2172/907768. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/907768.
@article{osti_907768,
title = {ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467},
author = {Martino, C and Daniel McCabe, D and Tommy Edwards, T and Ralph Nichols, R},
abstractNote = {Twelve LM-75 core samplers from Tank 28F sampling were received by SRNL for saltcake characterization. Of these, nine samplers contained mixtures of free liquid and saltcake, two contained only liquid, and one was empty. The saltcake contents generally appeared wet. A summary of the major tasks performed in this work are as follows: (1) Individual saltcake segments were extruded from the samplers and separated into saltcake and free liquid portions. (2) Free liquids were analyzed to estimate the amount of traced drill-string fluid contained in the samples. (3) The saltcake from each individual segment was homogenized, followed by analysis in duplicate. The analysis used more cost-effective and bounding radiochemical analyses rather than using the full Saltstone WAC suite. (4) A composite was created using an approximately equal percentage of each segment's saltcake contents. Supernatant liquid formed upon creation of the composite was decanted prior to use of the composite, but the composite was not drained. (5) A dissolution test was performed on the sample by contacting the composite with water at a 4:1 mass ratio of water to salt. The resulting soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed. Analysis focused on a large subset of the Saltstone WAC constituents.},
doi = {10.2172/907768},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Feb 28 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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