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Title: Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

Abstract

The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mremmore » assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903462
Report Number(s):
PNNL-14937 Rev. 1
TRN: US200722%%128
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARID LANDS; CLEARANCE; COMPLIANCE; CONTAMINATION; DOSE LIMITS; ECOLOGY; HABITAT; MONITORING; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIOISOTOPES; SAMPLING; SOILS

Citation Formats

Fritz, Brad G., Dirkes, Roger L., and Napier, Bruce A.. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/903462.
Fritz, Brad G., Dirkes, Roger L., & Napier, Bruce A.. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument. United States. doi:10.2172/903462.
Fritz, Brad G., Dirkes, Roger L., and Napier, Bruce A.. Sun . "Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument". United States. doi:10.2172/903462. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903462.
@article{osti_903462,
title = {Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument},
author = {Fritz, Brad G. and Dirkes, Roger L. and Napier, Bruce A.},
abstractNote = {The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.},
doi = {10.2172/903462},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM) was created by presidential proclamation in 2000. It is located along the Columbia River in south central Washington and consists of five distinct units. The McGee Ranch-Riverlands and the North Slope units are addressed in this report. North Slope refers to two of the HRNM units: the Saddle Mountain Unit and the Wahluke Slope Unit. The Saddle Mountain and Wahluke Slope Units are located north of the Columbia River, while the McGee Ranch-Riverlands Unit is located south of the Columbia River and north and west of Washington State Highway 24. To fulfill internal U.S.more » Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, the DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Authorized limits for residual radioactive contamination were developed based on the DOE annual exposure limit to the public (100 mrem) using future potential land-use scenarios. The DOE Office of Environmental Management approved these authorized limits on March 1, 2004. Historical soil monitoring conducted on and around the HRNM indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the authorized limits (Fritz et al. 2003). However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the McGee Ranch-Riverlands and North Slope units were below the authorized limits. Sixty-seven soil samples were collected from the McGee Ranch-Riverlands and North Slope units. A software package (Visual Sample Plan) was used to plan the collection to assure an adequate number of samples were collected. The number of samples necessary to decide with a high level of confidence (99%) that the soil concentrations of radionuclides on the North Slope and McGee Ranch-Riverlands units did not exceed the authorized limits was determined to be 27. Additional soil samples were collected from areas suspected to have a potential for accumulation of radionuclides. This included samples collected from the riparian zone along the Columbia River, Savage Island, and other locations across the North Slope and McGee Ranch-Riverlands units. The 67 soil samples collected from the McGee Ranch-Riverlands and North Slope units all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the authorized limits established by the DOE. Statistical analysis of the results concluded that the Authorized Limits were not exceeded when total uncertainty was considered. The calculated upper confidence limit for each radionuclide measured in this study (which represents the value at which 99% of the measurements reside below with a 99% confidence level) was lower than the Authorized Limit for each radionuclide. The maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the authorized limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.23 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem/year dose limit for members of the public. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the RESRAD biota code, indicated that the sum of fractions is less than one. This assumed soil concentrations equal to the maximum concentrations of radionuclides measured on the McGee Ranch-Riverlands and North Slope units’ in this study. Since the sum of fractions was less than 1, dose to terrestrial biota will not exceed the recommended biota dose limit for the soil concentrations measured in this study.« less
  • This document describes development of radiological release criteria (Authorized Limits) for Hanford Reach National Monument lands that DOE plans to release to the U.S. Department of the Interior.
  • This document describes soil sampling that will be performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Surface Environmental Surveillance Project on two units of the Hanford Reach National Monument: the McGee Ranch-Riverlands Unit (Riverlands Unit) and the North Slope made up of the Saddle Mountain Unit and the Wahluke Slope Unit. This sampling fulfills a U.S. Department of Energy requirement to evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5 prior to radiological release of the property.
  • On June 9, 2000, President William Clinton issued a proclamation to preserve 195,000 acres of land as a national monument in southeastern Washington State. Named the Hanford Reach Monument, it is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The monument has been preserved by unusual circumstances: for the past 50 years, it has served as the buffer area to one of the U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear reservations. As such, it has been allowed to remain wild, protecting it from human interference and preserving a number of important resources once found in abundance, but now in decline, throughout themore » Columbia River Basin. At the centerpiece of this monument is the last free flowing, non-tidal stretch of the Columbia River. Called the Hanford Reach, this 51-mile long section of the Columbia River supports one of the most productive spawning grounds for Chinook salmon. In addition to its natural resources, this monument also contains sites of rich and important archaeological and historical significance. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently working with the U.S. Department of Energy, the public, and a number of other interested parties to create a monument management plan, which is expected to be released sometime in mid-2004. But because of the unusual circumstances that have preserved this monument for the last 50 years, there are unique issues that must be addressed before this monument may be opened to the public. The purpose of this document is to evaluate the recreational land-usage patterns common to our nation's national monuments and apply those findings to what recreational activities are being considered and planned at the Hanford Reach National Monument. Based on these evaluations and taking the unique situation at the Hanford Site into consideration, recommendations are offered for the future management of the Hanford Reach National Monument.« less
  • Consistent with its current mission, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) plans to transfer ownership of large tracts of the Hanford Site in the next 3 to 5 years. Specifically, DOE-RL plans to transfer ownership of a large portion of the Hanford Reach National Monument to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Before DOE can transfer ownership of these tracts, a radiological clearance of the lands must be performed. Fluor Hanford, Inc., (FHI) is responsible for the radiological clearance for DOE-RL. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is supporting FHI on this effort through various work agreements.