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Title: Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona

Abstract

A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Portland Cement Company
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903448
Report Number(s):
DOEGO15095
TRN: US200722%%165
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-05GO15095
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ARIZONA; CEMENT INDUSTRY; ENERGY AUDITS; COMPRESSED AIR; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; PORTLAND CEMENT

Citation Formats

Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E., and Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/903448.
Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E., & Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona. United States. doi:10.2172/903448.
Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E., and Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM. Thu . "Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona". United States. doi:10.2172/903448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903448.
@article{osti_903448,
title = {Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona},
author = {Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E. and Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM},
abstractNote = {A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.},
doi = {10.2172/903448},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), through Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is supporting plant wide energy efficiency assessments that will lead to substantial improvements in industrial efficiency, waste reduction, productivity, and global competitiveness in industries identified in ITP’s Industries of the Future. The stated goal of the assessments is to develop a comprehensive strategy at manufacturing locations that will significantly increase plant productivity, profitability, and energy efficiency, and reduce environmental emissions. ITP awarded a contract to Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation to conduct a plant wide energy efficiency assessment for their Mt Pleasant Facility in Mt Pleasant,more » Texas. Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation is the largest poultry company in the U.S. and Mexico producing nearly 9 billion pounds of poultry per year. Pilgrim's Pride products are sold to foodservice, retail and frozen entrée customers. Pilgrim's Pride owns and operates 37 chicken processing plants (34 in the U.S. and three in Mexico), 12 prepared foods plants and one turkey processing plant. Thirty-five feed mills and 49 hatcheries support these plants. Pilgrim's Pride is ranked number 382 on 2006's FORTUNE 500 list and net sales were $7.4 billion. In Mt. Pleasant, Texas, Pilgrim's Pride operates one of the largest prepared foods plants in the United States, with the capability of producing 2,000 different products and the capacity to turn out more than 7 million pounds of finished goods per week. The facility is divided into distinct departments: East Kill, West Kill, Prepared Foods, Protein Conversion, Wastewater Treatment, and Truck Shop. Facility processes include killing, eviscerating, refrigeration, baking, frying, and protein conversion. Pilgrim’s Pride formed a team to complete the plant wide energy efficiency assessment. The scope of work for this project was to: provide the analysis of departmental energy use, identify areas for detailed analysis, perform a detailed analysis for several of the opportunities identified, and support the development of an energy strategy for the facility. The team consisted of Pace Global Energy Services, LLC; Hudson Technologies Company; Rocky Research, Inc.; and W.J. Turpish and Associates. The project used a systematic approach to complete a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment at the Mt Pleasant Facility. Major energy consuming equipment and processes were determined and opportunities for high annual savings potential were targeted for further evaluation. Exhibit 1 below summarizes the major savings opportunities at the site. The total energy savings represent 14% of the energy consumed on site on an MMBtu basis, with 12% of total energy savings achievable in projects with less than a two year payback. Pace Global Energy Services, LLC of Fairfax, Virginia provided the analysis of departmental energy use, identification of areas for detailed analysis, and support for the development of an energy strategy for the facility. Hudson Technologies Company analyzed the combustion and steam systems to identify opportunities for economic heat recovery and improvement in boiler operations. Rocky Research, Inc analyzed the refrigeration systems and W.J. Turpish and Associates reviewed the cooling towers and evaporative condensers.« less
  • Waste fly ash is produced by several coal-fired power generating plants in and adjacent to Arizona. A literature search, laboratory test program and analysis of test data indicate that available fly ashes can be advantageously used as admixtures in portland cement concrete for highway construction. Compressive strength, flexural strength, resistance to sulfate attack and freeze-thaw durability are included in the laboratory test series. Test data are used in the development of a mix design procedure aimed at optimizing the proportions of fly ash and portland cement.
  • The cost of energy as part of the total production costs in the cement industry is significant, warranting attention for energy efficiency to improve the bottom line. Historically, energy intensity has declined, although more recently energy intensity seems to have stabilized with the gains. Coal and coke are currently the primary fuels for the sector, supplanting the dominance of natural gas in the 1970s. Most recently, there is a slight increase in the use of waste fuels, including tires. Between 1970 and 1999, primary physical energy intensity for cement production dropped 1 percent/year from 7.3 MBtu/short ton to 5.3 MBtu/shortmore » ton. Carbon dioxide intensity due to fuel consumption and raw material calcination dropped 16 percent, from 609 lb. C/ton of cement (0.31 tC/tonne) to 510 lb. C/ton cement (0.26 tC/tonne). Despite the historic progress, there is ample room for energy efficiency improvement. The relatively high share of wet-process plants (25 percent of clinker production in 1999 in the U.S.) suggests the existence of a considerable potential, when compared to other industrialized countries. We examined over 40 energy efficient technologies and measures and estimated energy savings, carbon dioxide savings, investment costs, and operation and maintenance costs for each of the measures. The report describes the measures and experiences of cement plants around the wold with these practices and technologies. Substantial potential for energy efficiency improvement exists in the cement industry and in individual plants. A portion of this potential will be achieved as part of (natural) modernization and expansion of existing facilities, as well as construction of new plants in particular regions. Still, a relatively large potential for improved energy management practices exists.« less
  • Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking intomore » account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.« less
  • India’s cement industry is the second largest in the world behind China with annual cement production of 168 Mt in 2010 which accounted for slightly greater than six percent of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. To produce that amount of cement, the industry consumed roughly 700 PJ of fuel and 14.7 TWh of electricity. We identified and analyzed 22 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives ofmore » energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative cost-effective plant-level electricity savings potential for the Indian cement industry for 2010- 2030 is estimated to be 83 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is 89 TWh during the same period. The grid-level CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 82 Mt CO2 and the electric grid-level CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 88 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 1,029 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 97 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost over the next twenty years.« less