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Title: Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.

Abstract

This study examines the effects of the degradation experienced in the steel drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. Specifically, the structural integrity of the containment shell is examined in terms of the stress limits using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section III, Division I, Subsection NE, and examined in terms of buckling (stability) using the ASME B&PV Code Case N-284. Degradation of the steel containment shell (drywell) at Oyster Creek was first observed during an outage in the mid-1980s. Subsequent inspections discovered reductions in the shell thickness due to corrosion throughout the containment. Specifically, significant corrosion occurred in the sandbed region of the lower sphere. Since the presence of the wet sand provided an environment which supported corrosion, a series of analyses were conducted by GE Nuclear Energy in the early 1990s. These analyses examined the effects of the degradation on the structural integrity. The current study adopts many of the same assumptions and data used in the previous GE study. However, the additional computational recourses available today enable the construction of a larger and more sophisticated structural model.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903434
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0055
TRN: US0703523
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CONTAINMENT; CONTAINMENT SHELLS; CORROSION; NUCLEAR ENERGY; PRESSURE VESSELS; STRUCTURAL MODELS; Nuclear power plants-Quality control.; Nuclear power plants-Design and construction.; Structural stability.

Citation Formats

Petti, Jason P. Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/903434.
Petti, Jason P. Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.. United States. doi:10.2172/903434.
Petti, Jason P. Mon . "Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.". United States. doi:10.2172/903434. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903434.
@article{osti_903434,
title = {Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.},
author = {Petti, Jason P.},
abstractNote = {This study examines the effects of the degradation experienced in the steel drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. Specifically, the structural integrity of the containment shell is examined in terms of the stress limits using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section III, Division I, Subsection NE, and examined in terms of buckling (stability) using the ASME B&PV Code Case N-284. Degradation of the steel containment shell (drywell) at Oyster Creek was first observed during an outage in the mid-1980s. Subsequent inspections discovered reductions in the shell thickness due to corrosion throughout the containment. Specifically, significant corrosion occurred in the sandbed region of the lower sphere. Since the presence of the wet sand provided an environment which supported corrosion, a series of analyses were conducted by GE Nuclear Energy in the early 1990s. These analyses examined the effects of the degradation on the structural integrity. The current study adopts many of the same assumptions and data used in the previous GE study. However, the additional computational recourses available today enable the construction of a larger and more sophisticated structural model.},
doi = {10.2172/903434},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The growth, distribution, and species composition of marine borers (primarily shipworms) and fouling organisms are being studied in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Untreated wood test panels are used to collect organisms at 18 localities. Our most recent findings covering March 1--May 31, 1978 are that species composition has shifted slightly since 1976--1977: the number of Teredo furcifera has declined and the number of T. bartschi has increased slightly. T. bartschi, a subtropical species, is limited to Oyster Creek. The number of shipworms is significant (that is, shipworms are found in potentiallymore » damaging numbers) at station 11 in Oyster Creek. However, some control stations (sta. 2 and 18) show much heavier damage. Oyster Creek contains more species than control areas. Patterns of settlement of fouling organisms were not closely linked to the power plant effluent during the period of study, March--May 1978. Time of settlement, growth, and species composition of fouling organisms vary from year to year.« less
  • The growth, distribution, and species composition of marine borers (primarily shipworms) and fouling organisms are being studied in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Untreated wood test panels are used to collect organisms at 18 localities. Findings covering December 1, 1978-February 28, 1979 show that Teredo bartschi is breeding in Forked River as well as Oyster Creek. Populations were reduced but not eliminated by winter temperatures. Damage to test panels in Oyster Creek is very heavy, equalled only at Barnegat Light. Although there was no settlement on monthly panels, adult T. bartschi weremore » able to maintain larvae in the gills. Stations in control creeks showed virtually no shipworm infestation. It is concluded that there remains a shipworm problem in Oyster Creek and Forked River that is related to the presence of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station.« less
  • The growth, distribution, and species composition of marine borers (primarily shipworms) and fouling organisms are being studied in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Untreated wood test panels are used to collect organisms at 18 localities. Our most recent findings covering September--November, 1978, are that at least one subtropical species of the borer family Teredinidae continues to live in Oyster Creek; it now breeds at the mouth of Forked River. The subtropical Teredo bartschi living in Oyster Creek retained well-developed larvae in the gills through November, while the native species B. gouldi spawnedmore » out. The gonads of B. gouldi were vanishingly small in November. Larvae of T. bartschi settled in Oyster Creek and larvae of the native T. navalis settled on Long Beach Island in September, but no later. The last B. gouldi of the season settled in August. The greatest wood damage occurred at station 12 in Oyster Creek. Increased siltation on rocks in Oyster Creek decreased both the abundance and the diversity of fouling organisms. The introduced polychaete Mercierella enigmatica has been found in Oyster Creek as well as stations to the north.« less
  • The growth, distribution, and species composition of marine borers (primarily shipworms) and fouling organisms are being studied in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Untreated wood test panels are used to collect organisms at 18 localities. Our most recent findings covering December 1977 to February 1978 are that two subtropical species of the borer family Teredinidae live in Oyster Creek; one species has spread to wooden structures outside of Oyster Creek. Shipworms living in Oyster Creek show advanced gonad development over specimens collected elsewhere, but no new shipworm larvae settled on wooden testmore » structures during the winter of 1977--1978. Fouling organisms such as bryozoa and tunicates settled in Oyster Creek at higher numbers than at other stations during the winter months. Shipworm damage is highest at two control stations with high salinity and strong water currents. Shipworms still exist in Oyster Creek but at numbers lower than existed in 1974--1975. Forked River, especially the lower portions, contains shipworms.« less
  • The growth, distribution, and species composition of marine borers (primarily shipworms) and fouling organisms are being studied in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. Untreated wood test panels are used to collect organisms at 18 localities. Our most recent findings covering June-August, 1979, are that at least one subtropical species of the borer family Teredinidae, Teredo bartschi, continues to live in Oyster Creek and can breed in Forked River, although many die off in winter in Forked River and the species may have to recolonize. A few of the subtropical T. furcifera alsomore » survive in Oyster Creek but cause negligible damage at present, compared with T. bartschi. The summer, 1979, outbreak of T. bartschi in Oyster Creek was severe, causing nearly total destruction to wood panels. The breeding season for T. bartschi was the same as in 1978. Some fouling organisms were present in Oyster Creek that are absent in control creek stations due to low salinity.« less