skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

Abstract

This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903407
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00256
Journal ID: ISSN 1532-0383; TRN: US200720%%253
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Soil and Sediment Contamination
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MATERIALS TESTING; CLAYS; ZEOLITES; PHOSPHATES; ORGANIC POLYMERS; ADSORBENTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; METALS; DESORPTION; PHENANTHRENE; PYRENE; BENZOPYRENE

Citation Formats

Knox, A, Michael Paller, M, Danny D. Reible, D, Xingmao Ma, X, and Ioana G. Petrisor, I. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Knox, A, Michael Paller, M, Danny D. Reible, D, Xingmao Ma, X, & Ioana G. Petrisor, I. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS. United States.
Knox, A, Michael Paller, M, Danny D. Reible, D, Xingmao Ma, X, and Ioana G. Petrisor, I. Thu . "SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903407.
@article{osti_903407,
title = {SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS},
author = {Knox, A and Michael Paller, M and Danny D. Reible, D and Xingmao Ma, X and Ioana G. Petrisor, I},
abstractNote = {This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Soil and Sediment Contamination},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • This research evaluated the removal of inorganic contaminants by a variety of amendments and mixtures of amendments in fresh and salt water. A series of removal and retention batch experiments was conducted to identify the best treatment for metal removal. Metal removal by the amendments was evaluated by calculating the partition coefficient and percent removal. Retention of metals by the amendments was evaluated in retention (desorption) studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays (e.g., OCB-750), and the biopolymer, chitosan, are very effective inmore » removal and retention of metals in both fresh and salt water. These amendments are being evaluated further as components in the development of active caps for sediment remediation.« less
  • Laboratory and greenhouse studies were conducted to quantify apatite and phillipsite (zeolite) sequestration of selected metal contaminants. Results from the laboratory study were used to design the greenhouse study that used a soil impacted by a Zn-Pb smelter from Pribram, Czech Republic.
  • Ozone is investigated as a general oxidant for trace organic sequestering agents in water. The course of destruction of sequestering agents is monitored by observing the liberation of free-ion Pb and Cd at the part-per-billion level. The model compounds used for developing the presented method are: EDTA, APDC, tannic, and humic acids. The method is applied to the determination of Pb and Cd in sewage effluent and in San Francisco Bay water. A method by which humic acid having an initial ash content of greater than 11 percent is reduced to less than 0.1 percent is discussed.
  • This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.
  • The solution equilibria for the reaction of Ga(III) and In(III) with the hexadentate ligands N, N', N''-tris(2,3-dihydroxy-5-sulfonatobenzoyl)-1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)benzene (MECAMS) and N, N', N''-tris(2,3-dihydroxy-5-sulfonatobenzoyl)-1,5,10-triazadecane (3,4-LICAMS) and the bidentate catechol N,N-dimethyl-2,3-dihydroxy-5-sulfonatobenzamide (DMBS) have been determined on 0.1 M KNO/sub 3/ at 25/sup 0/C. Both Ga(III) and In(III) are coordinated by three catecholate groups at high pH and have formation constants of the order ..beta../sub 110/ = 10/sup 38/ M/sup -1/. As the acidity of the medium is increased, the metal complexes of the hexadentate sequestering agents undergo protonation reactions. For the determination of the nature of the protonated metal chelates, the stretching frequencymore » of the amide carbonyl has been monitored in D/sub 2/O by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT IR). These data support a series of two one-proton steps to form a mixed salicylate-catecholate coordination about the metal ion. In the salicylate bonding mode the metal is bound through the ortho phenolic oxygen and the amide cabonyl whereas catecholate coordination is via the adjacent phenols. In contrast, protonation of the M/sup III/(DMBS)/sub 3/ complexes results in dissociation of a catechol moiety to form M/sup III/(DMBS)/sub 2/. The potential use of these compounds as tumor-imaging agents in cancer diagnosis is discussed, with specific attention to the role of the gallium transferrin complex.« less