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Title: Uranium Reduction

Abstract

The dramatic decrease in solubility accompanying thereduction of U(VI) to U(IV), producing the insoluble mineral uraninite,has been viewed as a potential mechanism for sequestration of environmentaluranium contamination. In the past 15 years, it has been firmlyestablished that a variety of bacteria exhibit this reductive capacity.To obtain an understanding of the microbial metal metabolism, to developa practical approach for the acceleration of in situ bioreduction, and topredict the long-term fate of environmental uranium, several aspects ofthe microbial process have been experimentally explored. This reviewbriefly addresses the research to identify specific uranium reductasesand their cellular location, competition between uranium and otherelectron acceptors, attempts to stimulate in situ reduction, andmechanisms of reoxidation of reduced uranium minerals.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
COLLABORATION - U.Missouri-Columbia
OSTI Identifier:
903128
Report Number(s):
LBNL-60458
R&D Project: VGTLTH; BnR: KP1102010; TRN: US0703206
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annual Review of Microbiology; Journal Volume: 60; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59; 54; 12; ACCELERATION; BACTERIA; BINDING ENERGY; CAPACITY; CONTAMINATION; ELECTRONS; METABOLISM; OXIDOREDUCTASES; SOLUBILITY; URANIUM; URANIUM MINERALS; VALENCE; c-type cytochromes nanowires uraninite uranium reoxidationbioremediation

Citation Formats

Wall, J.D., and Krumholz, L.R.. Uranium Reduction. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Wall, J.D., & Krumholz, L.R.. Uranium Reduction. United States.
Wall, J.D., and Krumholz, L.R.. Mon . "Uranium Reduction". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_903128,
title = {Uranium Reduction},
author = {Wall, J.D. and Krumholz, L.R.},
abstractNote = {The dramatic decrease in solubility accompanying thereduction of U(VI) to U(IV), producing the insoluble mineral uraninite,has been viewed as a potential mechanism for sequestration of environmentaluranium contamination. In the past 15 years, it has been firmlyestablished that a variety of bacteria exhibit this reductive capacity.To obtain an understanding of the microbial metal metabolism, to developa practical approach for the acceleration of in situ bioreduction, and topredict the long-term fate of environmental uranium, several aspects ofthe microbial process have been experimentally explored. This reviewbriefly addresses the research to identify specific uranium reductasesand their cellular location, competition between uranium and otherelectron acceptors, attempts to stimulate in situ reduction, andmechanisms of reoxidation of reduced uranium minerals.},
doi = {},
journal = {Annual Review of Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}