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Title: ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL

Abstract

Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903098
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00230
TRN: US200720%%78
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The 11th International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUIFERS; CARCINOGENS; CONTAMINATION; DECAY; DRINKING WATER; SIMULATION; SOILS; THICKNESS; TOXINS; TRANSPORT; WASTES

Citation Formats

Rucker, G. ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Rucker, G. ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL. United States.
Rucker, G. Tue . "ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903098.
@article{osti_903098,
title = {ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL},
author = {Rucker, G},
abstractNote = {Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soilmore » properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)« less
  • Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) are threshold concentrations below which there is no concern for the migration of residual soil contaminants to the aquifer above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). At sites where contaminant concentrations exceed SSLs, further study maybe warranted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). SSLs are based upon simplified fate and transport assumptions, but the guidance allows the flexibility to develop a detailed modeling approach that accounts for complex site variables such as degradation and thickness of the vadose zone. The distinct advantage of the detailed modeling is that individual sites may calculate a lessmore » restrictive, but still protective SSL. A Multi-Layer Vadose Zone Contaminant Migration Model [VZCOMML(C)] was developed at the Savannah River Site to allay the higher costs of detailed modeling and achieve a higher clean-up level. The software model is faster, simpler, and less expensive to us e than other commercially available codes.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Researchers of various disciplines associated with environmental cleanup are beginning to investigate the use of partitioning tracers to determine and characterize contaminated sites. Characterizing the vadose, or unsaturated zone, as well as the saturated zone is imperative because there are areas in the western US with large vadose zones that are contaminated by nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs). This paper presents laboratory experiments conducted to determine the partition coefficients between air and NAPL for several gas tracers. Once the tracers` partition coefficients have been estimated, they may be used to estimate NAPL volumes in situ. The experiments entailed the introduction of trichloroethylenemore » (TCE) into a column packed with Ottawa sand and containing a residual amount of water. With a known amount of TCE in the column, partitioning gas tracers were injected and their breakthrough monitored. Using the method of moments, the partition coefficients of the tracers were estimated. The gas tracers used in this experiment included argon as a nonpartitioning tracer and several perfluorocarbons as partitioning tracers. The experimental results demonstrate that partitioning gas tracers and, in particular, perfluorocarbons, may be used to estimate residual NAPL saturations in the vadose zone.« less
  • Immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals in the vadose zone by In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a promising technology for soil remediation. Earlier laboratory and field studies have shown that Cr(VI) can be effectively immobilized by treatment with dilute gaseous H2S. The objective of this project is to characterize the interactions among H2S, the metal contaminants, and soil components. Understanding these interactions is needed to assess the long-term effectiveness of the technology and to optimize the remediation system.