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Title: Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field

Abstract

The large-scale Galactic interstellar radiation field (ISRF) is the result of stellar emission and dust re-processing of starlight. Where the energy density of the ISRF is high (e.g., the Galactic Centre), the dominant {gamma}-ray emission in individual supernova remnants (SNRs), such as G0.9+0.1, may come from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the ISRF. Several models of the ISRF exist. The most recent one, which has been calculated by us, predicts a significantly higher ISRF than the well used model of Mathis, Mezger, and Panagia [1]. However, comparison with data is limited to local observations. Based on our current estimate of the ISRF we predict the gamma-ray emission in the SNRs G0.9+0.1 and RXJ1713, and pair-production absorption features above 20 TeV in the spectra of G0.9+0.1, J1713-381, and J1634-472. We discuss how GLAST, along with current and future very high energy instruments, may be able to provide upper bounds on the large-scale ISRF.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
903008
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12466
arXiv:0704.1703; TRN: US200719%%125
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Contributed to 1st GLAST Symposium, Stanford, Palo Alto, 5-8 Feb 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ENERGY DENSITY; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; EMISSION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; ASTROPHYSICS; Astrophysics,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Porter, T.A., Moskalenko, I.V., and Strong, A.W. Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Porter, T.A., Moskalenko, I.V., & Strong, A.W. Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field. United States.
Porter, T.A., Moskalenko, I.V., and Strong, A.W. Mon . "Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/903008.
@article{osti_903008,
title = {Very High Energy Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants and Constraints on the Galactic Interstellar Radiation Field},
author = {Porter, T.A. and Moskalenko, I.V. and Strong, A.W.},
abstractNote = {The large-scale Galactic interstellar radiation field (ISRF) is the result of stellar emission and dust re-processing of starlight. Where the energy density of the ISRF is high (e.g., the Galactic Centre), the dominant {gamma}-ray emission in individual supernova remnants (SNRs), such as G0.9+0.1, may come from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the ISRF. Several models of the ISRF exist. The most recent one, which has been calculated by us, predicts a significantly higher ISRF than the well used model of Mathis, Mezger, and Panagia [1]. However, comparison with data is limited to local observations. Based on our current estimate of the ISRF we predict the gamma-ray emission in the SNRs G0.9+0.1 and RXJ1713, and pair-production absorption features above 20 TeV in the spectra of G0.9+0.1, J1713-381, and J1634-472. We discuss how GLAST, along with current and future very high energy instruments, may be able to provide upper bounds on the large-scale ISRF.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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