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Title: Analyzing Historical Cost Trends in California's Market for Customer-Sited Photovoltaics

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902871
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 1, January 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; MARKET; CALIFORNIA; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SUPPLIES; ON-SITE POWER GENERATION; COST; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; Energy Analysis

Citation Formats

Wiser, R., Bolinger, M., Cappers, P., and Margolis, R. Analyzing Historical Cost Trends in California's Market for Customer-Sited Photovoltaics. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1002/pip.726.
Wiser, R., Bolinger, M., Cappers, P., & Margolis, R. Analyzing Historical Cost Trends in California's Market for Customer-Sited Photovoltaics. United States. doi:10.1002/pip.726.
Wiser, R., Bolinger, M., Cappers, P., and Margolis, R. Mon . "Analyzing Historical Cost Trends in California's Market for Customer-Sited Photovoltaics". United States. doi:10.1002/pip.726.
@article{osti_902871,
title = {Analyzing Historical Cost Trends in California's Market for Customer-Sited Photovoltaics},
author = {Wiser, R. and Bolinger, M. and Cappers, P. and Margolis, R.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1002/pip.726},
journal = {Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications},
number = 1, January 2007,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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