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Title: DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES

Abstract

Sediment bacteria samples were collected from three streams in South Carolina, two contaminated with multiple metals (Four Mile Creek and Castor Creek), one uncontaminated (Meyers Branch), and another metal contaminated stream (Lampert Creek) in northern Washington State. Growth plates inoculated with Four Mile Creek sample extracts show bacteria colony growth after incubation on plates containing either one of two aminoglycosides (kanamycin or streptomycin), tetracycline or chloramphenocol. This study analyzes the spatial pattern of antibiotic resistance in culturable sediment bacteria in all four streams that may be due to metal contamination. We summarize the two aminoglycoside resistance measures and the 10 metals concentrations by Principal Components Analysis. Respectively, 63% and 58% of the variability was explained in the 1st principal component of each variable set. We used the respective multivariate summary metrics (i.e. 1st principal component scores) as input measures for exploring the spatial correlation between antibiotic resistance and metal concentration for each stream reach sampled. Results show a significant and negative correlation between metals scores versus aminoglycoside resistance scores and suggest that selection for metal tolerance among sediment bacteria may influence selection for antibiotic resistance differently than previously supposed.. In addition, we borrow a method from geostatistics (variography) wherein amore » spatial cross-correlation analysis shows that decreasing metal concentrations scores are associated with increasing aminoglycoside resistance scores as the separation distance between sediment samples decreases, but for contaminated streams only. Since these results were counter to our initial expectation and to other experimental evidence for water column bacteria, we suspect our field results are influenced by metal bioavailability in the sediments and by a contaminant promoted interaction or ''cocktail effect'' from complex combinations of pollution mediated selection agents.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (NOEMAIL), J
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902855
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00196
Journal ID: ISSN 0095-3628; MCBEBU; TRN: US200719%%72
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Microbial Ecology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANTIBIOTICS; BACTERIA; INCUBATION; POLLUTION; SEDIMENTS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; STREAMS; STREPTOMYCIN; TETRACYCLINES; TOLERANCE; METALS; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY

Citation Formats

Tuckfield, C, and J V Mcarthur. DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Tuckfield, C, & J V Mcarthur. DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES. United States.
Tuckfield, C, and J V Mcarthur. Mon . "DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902855.
@article{osti_902855,
title = {DOWN-STREAM SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TRAITS ALONG METAL CONTAMINATED STREAM REACHES},
author = {Tuckfield, C and J V Mcarthur},
abstractNote = {Sediment bacteria samples were collected from three streams in South Carolina, two contaminated with multiple metals (Four Mile Creek and Castor Creek), one uncontaminated (Meyers Branch), and another metal contaminated stream (Lampert Creek) in northern Washington State. Growth plates inoculated with Four Mile Creek sample extracts show bacteria colony growth after incubation on plates containing either one of two aminoglycosides (kanamycin or streptomycin), tetracycline or chloramphenocol. This study analyzes the spatial pattern of antibiotic resistance in culturable sediment bacteria in all four streams that may be due to metal contamination. We summarize the two aminoglycoside resistance measures and the 10 metals concentrations by Principal Components Analysis. Respectively, 63% and 58% of the variability was explained in the 1st principal component of each variable set. We used the respective multivariate summary metrics (i.e. 1st principal component scores) as input measures for exploring the spatial correlation between antibiotic resistance and metal concentration for each stream reach sampled. Results show a significant and negative correlation between metals scores versus aminoglycoside resistance scores and suggest that selection for metal tolerance among sediment bacteria may influence selection for antibiotic resistance differently than previously supposed.. In addition, we borrow a method from geostatistics (variography) wherein a spatial cross-correlation analysis shows that decreasing metal concentrations scores are associated with increasing aminoglycoside resistance scores as the separation distance between sediment samples decreases, but for contaminated streams only. Since these results were counter to our initial expectation and to other experimental evidence for water column bacteria, we suspect our field results are influenced by metal bioavailability in the sediments and by a contaminant promoted interaction or ''cocktail effect'' from complex combinations of pollution mediated selection agents.},
doi = {},
journal = {Microbial Ecology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}