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Title: USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

Abstract

A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902853
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00176
TRN: US0703058
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IT 2007 Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ORGANIC BORON COMPOUNDS; WET OXIDATION PROCESSES; DECOMPOSITION; WASTE PROCESSING; FEASIBILITY STUDIES

Citation Formats

Adu-Wusu, K, Daniel McCabe, D, and Bill Wilmarth, B. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Adu-Wusu, K, Daniel McCabe, D, & Bill Wilmarth, B. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE. United States.
Adu-Wusu, K, Daniel McCabe, D, and Bill Wilmarth, B. Wed . "USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902853.
@article{osti_902853,
title = {USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE},
author = {Adu-Wusu, K and Daniel McCabe, D and Bill Wilmarth, B},
abstractNote = {A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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