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Title: The industrial Center at Mississippi State University

Abstract

The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Mississippi State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902750
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO/12081-1
TRN: US200722%%32
DOE Contract Number:
FC36-02GO12081
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MISSISSIPPI; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; INDUSTRY; ENERGY AUDITS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Citation Formats

b.K. Hodge, and Mary C. Emplaincourt. The industrial Center at Mississippi State University. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/902750.
b.K. Hodge, & Mary C. Emplaincourt. The industrial Center at Mississippi State University. United States. doi:10.2172/902750.
b.K. Hodge, and Mary C. Emplaincourt. Mon . "The industrial Center at Mississippi State University". United States. doi:10.2172/902750. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902750.
@article{osti_902750,
title = {The industrial Center at Mississippi State University},
author = {b.K. Hodge and Mary C. Emplaincourt},
abstractNote = {The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.},
doi = {10.2172/902750},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portionmore » of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.« less
  • Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental,more » and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.« less
  • The Sustainable Energy Research Center (SERC) project at Mississippi State University included all phases of biofuel production from feedstock development, to conversion to liquid transportation fuels, to engine testing of the fuels. The feedstocks work focused on non-food based crops and yielded an increased understanding of many significant Southeastern feedstocks. an emphasis was placed on energy grasses that could supplement the primary feedstock, wood. Two energy grasses, giant miscanthus and switchgrass, were developed that had increased yields per acre. Each of these grasses was patented and licensed to companies for commercialization. The fuels work focused on three different technologies thatmore » each led to a gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel product. The three technologies were microbial oil, pyrolysis oil, and syngas-to liquid-hydrocarbons« less
  • Since 1976 Mississippi State's MHD Energy Center has been conducting MHD research sponsored by the US DOE - first into long-term corrosion of materials in radiant boilers, and since 1979 into heat recovery and seed recovery. This research has been conducted largely through use of a test stand which simulates conditions in the MHD gas stream. Continual modification of the test stand to reflect experimental results has produced a test stand capable of test runs of 100 hours; runs of more than 500 hours are being planned. The test stand is described, and experimental results are discussed. Also, the designmore » and construction of an MHD radiant boiler at Mississippi State's MHD Energy Center are described. The radiant furnace serves several functions in a heat recovery and seed recovery system; it cools flue gases to a temperature suitable for entrance to the secondary superheater; it generates steam; it provides for the removal of molten ash at high temperatures; and it provides access for intrusive and nonintrusive instrumentation to the gas-side environment. (WHK)« less
  • The DOE proposes to authorize Washington State University (WSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes (CAIP). The proposed project would involve construction of a three story building containing laboratories, classrooms, seminar rooms, and graduate student and administrative office space. Existing buildings would be demolished. The proposed facility would house research in thermal/fluid sciences, bioengineering, manufacturing processes, and materials processing. Under the {open_quotes}no-action{close_quotes} DOE would not authorize WSU to proceed with construction under the grant. WSU would then need to consider alternatives for proceeding without DOE funds. Such alternatives (includingmore » delaying or scaling back the project), would result in a postponement or slight reduction in the minor adverse environmental, safety and health Impacts of the project evaluated in this assessment. More importantly, these alternatives would affect the important environmental, safety, health, and programmatic benefits of the projects. The surrounding area is fully urbanized and the campus is intensely developed around the proposed site. The buildings scheduled for demolition do not meet State energy codes, are not air conditioned, and lack handicapped access. Sensitive resources (historical/archeological, protected species/critical habitats, wetlands/floodplains, national forests/parks/trails, prime farmland and special sources of water) would not be affected as they do not occur on or near the proposed site. Cumulative impacts would be small. The proposed action is not related to other actions being considered under other NEPA reviews. There is no conflict between the proposed action and any applicable Federal, State, regional or local land use plans and policies.« less