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Title: Digging Into Dirt: Subsurface Science at PNNL

Abstract

Imagine drinking water that has dripped through the sponge you’ve just used to clean the breakfast dishes. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals, and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply rivers, lakes and drinking water. We need to understand this system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water. That's where Pacific Northwest National Laboratory comes in.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902672
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53417
TRN: US200722%%330
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Breakthroughs. Science, Technology, Innovation., Winter 2007:11; Journal Volume: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AVAILABILITY; DRINKING WATER; LAKES; PESTICIDES; RADIOISOTOPES; RAIN; RIVERS; SNOW; SOILS; soil; vadose zone

Citation Formats

Manke, Kristin L. Digging Into Dirt: Subsurface Science at PNNL. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Manke, Kristin L. Digging Into Dirt: Subsurface Science at PNNL. United States.
Manke, Kristin L. Thu . "Digging Into Dirt: Subsurface Science at PNNL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902672.
@article{osti_902672,
title = {Digging Into Dirt: Subsurface Science at PNNL},
author = {Manke, Kristin L.},
abstractNote = {Imagine drinking water that has dripped through the sponge you’ve just used to clean the breakfast dishes. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals, and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply rivers, lakes and drinking water. We need to understand this system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water. That's where Pacific Northwest National Laboratory comes in.},
doi = {},
journal = {Breakthroughs. Science, Technology, Innovation., Winter 2007:11},
number = ,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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