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Title: Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications

Abstract

In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. The goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectivesmore » such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of South Alabama
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
902512
Report Number(s):
5-22895
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-05CH11295
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; Hydrogen production, storage, energy management and control

Citation Formats

MOhammad S. Alam. Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/902512.
MOhammad S. Alam. Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications. United States. doi:10.2172/902512.
MOhammad S. Alam. Mon . "Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications". United States. doi:10.2172/902512. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902512.
@article{osti_902512,
title = {Smart Energy Management of Multiple Full Cell Powered Applications},
author = {MOhammad S. Alam},
abstractNote = {In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. The goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectives such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.},
doi = {10.2172/902512},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In this research project the University of South Alabama research team has been investigating smart energy management and control of multiple fuel cell power sources when subjected to varying demands of electrical and thermal loads together with demands of hydrogen production. This research has focused on finding the optimal schedule of the multiple fuel cell power plants in terms of electric, thermal and hydrogen energy. The optimal schedule is expected to yield the lowest operating cost. Our team is also investigating the possibility of generating hydrogen using photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells through finding materials for efficient light harvesting photoanodes. Themore » goal is to develop an efficient and cost effective PEC solar cell system for direct electrolysis of water. In addition, models for hydrogen production, purification, and storage will be developed. The results obtained and the data collected will be then used to develop a smart energy management algorithm whose function is to maximize energy conservation within a managed set of appliances, thereby lowering O/M costs of the Fuel Cell power plant (FCPP), and allowing more hydrogen generation opportunities. The Smart Energy Management and Control (SEMaC) software, developed earlier, controls electrical loads in an individual home to achieve load management objectives such that the total power consumption of a typical residential home remains below the available power generated from a fuel cell. In this project, the research team will leverage the SEMaC algorithm developed earlier to create a neighborhood level control system.« less
  • On-going test experience with a 5kW methanol-air integrated system is described. Long-term successful operation of a semi-automated electrolyte-replenishment system and non-metallic cooling plates was sustained in a 24-cell, two sq. ft. (4kW) stack. Single-cell test results for two developmental cathode catalysts are reported. Corrosion-protection efforts for metallic current-collecting plates are described.
  • Satisfactory performance is reported for the first 12-cell sub-stack of the 5 kW rebuild using improved ABA reactant distribution plates. Construction and test results are described for the first full-sized single-cell test (0.33 m x 0.56 m). Test duration was 450 hours. Plans are outlined for construction and testing of two methanol reformer units based on commercially-available shell-and-tube heat exchangers. A 5 kW-equivalent precursor and a 50 kW-equivalent prototype will be built. Supporting design and single-tube experimental data are presented. Stack support efforts are summarized on corrosion currents of graphite materials and acid-management of single-cell test facilities. Comparative properties aremore » summarized for the two methanol/steam reforming catalysts evaluated under Tak V (now completed): T2107RS and C70-2RS.« less
  • A schematic and physical layout is given for the 5kW integrated system and the development status of individual components is described. The results of using a one dimensional mathematical model of the 5kW reformer are presented. Plans for a single-tube reformer test unit for the acquisition of temperature profile data are described. Tentative specifications for a 50kW dc-to-ac inverter are listed. Performance data are given on two 3-cell stacks incorporating semiautomatic acid replenishment systems and improved electrocatalysts. A qualification test on methanol/steam reforming catalyst T2107RS is reported, including a portion in which the catalyst was deliberately poisoned with 800 ppmmore » ethanol in the feed.« less
  • Progress toward an integrated 5kW power system based upon methanol fuel and a phosphoric acid fuel cell operating at about 473 K is described in detail. Description includes test results of advanced fuel cell catalysts, a semi-automatic acid replenishment system and a completed 5kW methanol/steam reformer. Design features of a 5kW fuel cell stack are included. The results of a preliminary system test on a reformer/stack/inverter combination are reported. An initial design for a 25 kW stack is presented. Experimental plans are outlined for data acquisition necessary for design of a 50 kW methanol/steam reformer. Activities related to complete mathematicalmore » modelling of the integrated power system, including wasteheat utilization are described.« less