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Title: Transverse Coherence Properties of the LCLS X-Ray Beam

Abstract

Self-amplifying spontaneous radiation free-electron lasers, such as the LCLS or the European X-FEL, rely on the incoherent, spontaneous radiation as the seed for the amplifying process. Though this method overcomes the need for an external seed source one drawback is the incoherence of the effective seed signal. The FEL process allows for a natural growth of the coherence because the radiation phase information is spread out within the bunch due to slippage and diffraction of the radiation field. However, at short wavelengths this spreading is not sufficient to achieve complete coherence. In this presentation we report on the results of numerical simulations of the LCLS X-ray FEL. From the obtained radiation field distribution the coherence properties are extracted to help to characterize the FEL as a light source.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902501
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12456
TRN: US0702840
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Prepared for 28th International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL 2006), Berlin, Germany, 27 Aug - 1 Sep 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LIGHT SOURCES; COHERENT RADIATION; BEAM BUNCHING; Accelerators,ACCPHY

Citation Formats

Reiche, S., and /UCLA. Transverse Coherence Properties of the LCLS X-Ray Beam. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Reiche, S., & /UCLA. Transverse Coherence Properties of the LCLS X-Ray Beam. United States.
Reiche, S., and /UCLA. Mon . "Transverse Coherence Properties of the LCLS X-Ray Beam". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902501.
@article{osti_902501,
title = {Transverse Coherence Properties of the LCLS X-Ray Beam},
author = {Reiche, S. and /UCLA},
abstractNote = {Self-amplifying spontaneous radiation free-electron lasers, such as the LCLS or the European X-FEL, rely on the incoherent, spontaneous radiation as the seed for the amplifying process. Though this method overcomes the need for an external seed source one drawback is the incoherence of the effective seed signal. The FEL process allows for a natural growth of the coherence because the radiation phase information is spread out within the bunch due to slippage and diffraction of the radiation field. However, at short wavelengths this spreading is not sufficient to achieve complete coherence. In this presentation we report on the results of numerical simulations of the LCLS X-ray FEL. From the obtained radiation field distribution the coherence properties are extracted to help to characterize the FEL as a light source.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Self-amplifying spontaneous radiation free-electron lasers, such as the LCLS or the European X-FEL, rely on the incoherent, spontaneous radiation as the seed for the amplifying process. Though this method overcomes the need for an external seed source one drawback is the incoherence of the effective seed signal. The FEL process allows for a natural growth of the coherence because the radiation phase information is spread out within the bunch due to slippage and diffraction of the radiation field. However, at short wavelengths this spreading is not sufficient to achieve complete coherence. In this presentation we report on the results ofmore » numerical simulations of the LCLS X-ray FEL. From the obtained radiation field distribution the coherence properties are extracted to help to characterize the FEL as a light source.« less
  • The recently commissioned Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is now operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron sources. Understanding of coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs at LCLS is of great practical importance for some user experiments. We present the numerical analysis of the coherence properties at different wavelengths based on a fast algorithmusing ideal and start-end simulated FEL fields. The sucessful commissioning and operation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) [1] has demonstrated thatmore » the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) has come of age; these types of x-ray sources are poised to revolutionize the ultra-fast x-ray sciences. The LCLS and other hard x-ray FELs under construction are based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) [2, 3], where the amplification process starts from the shot noise in the electron beam. A large number of transverse radiation modes are also excited when the electron beam enters the undulator. The FEL collective instability in the electron beam causes the modulation of the electron density to increase exponentially, and after sufficient undulator distances, a single transverse mode starts to dominate. As a result, SASE FEL is almost fully coherent in the transverse dimension. Understanding of transverse coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs is of great practical importance. The longitudinal coherence properties of SASE FELs have been studied before [4]. Some studies on the transverse coherence can be found in previous papers, for example, in ref. [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In this paper, we first discuss a new numerical algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the FEL transverse coherence. Then we focus on the numerical analysis of the LCLS FEL transverse coherence.« less
  • The LCLS is a novel high-brightness x-ray source designed to operate in the 300--400 eV range. In contrast to conventional synchrotron radiation sources, its output pulses will be characterized by unprecedented levels of brevity and peak power. In this paper we present recently-developed beam line layouts and design features intended to optimize the delivery of the LCLS photons to various experimental stations.
  • The Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron radiation sources. At the low charge operation mode (20 pC), the x-ray pulse length can be <10 fs. In this paper we report our numerical optimization and simulations to produce even shorter x-ray pulses by optimizing the machine and undulator setup at 20 pC charge. In the soft x-ray regime, with combination of slotted-foil or undulator taper, a single spike x-ray pulse is achievablemore » with peak FEL power of a few 10s GW. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray Free electron laser (FEL), has started operation since 2009. With nominal operation charge of 250 pC, the generated x-ray pulse length is from 70 fs to a few hundred fs. This marks the beginning of a new era of ultrashort x-ray sciences. In addition, a low charge (20pC) operation mode has also been established. Since the collective effects are reduced at the low charge mode, we can increase the compression factor and still achieve a few kA peak current. The expected electron beam and x-ray pulses are less than 10 fs. There are growing interests in even shorter x-ray pulses, such as fs to sub-fs regime. One of the simple solutions is going to even lower charge. As discussed, single-spike x-ray pulses can be generated using 1 pC charge. However, this charge level is out of the present LCLS diagnostic range. 20 pC is a reasonable operation charge at LCLS, based on the present diagnostic system. At 20 pC in the soft x-ray wavelength regime, we have experimentally demonstrated that FEL can work at undercompression or over-compression mode, such as 1 degree off the full-compression; at full-compression, however, there is almost no lasing. In hard x-ray wavelength regime, we observed that there are reasonable photons generated even at full-compression mode, although the photon number is less than that from under-compression or over-compression mode. Since we cannot measure the x-ray pulse length at this time scale, the machine is typically optimized for generating maximum photons, not minimum pulse length. In this paper, we study the methods of producing femtosecond (or single-spike) x-ray pulses at LCLS with 20 pC charge, based on start-to-end simulations. Figure 1 shows a layout of LCLS. The compression in the second bunch compressor (BC2) determines the final e-beam bunch length. However, the laser heater, dog-leg after the main linac (DL2) and collective effects also affect the final bunch length. To adjust BC2 compression, we can either change the L2 phase or BC2 R{sub 56}. In this paper we only tune L2 phase while keep BC2 R{sub 56} fixed. For the start-to-end simulations, we used IMPACT-T and ELEGANT tracking from the photocathode to the entrance of the undulator, after that the FEL radiation was simulated with GENESIS. IMPACT-T tracks about 10{sup 6} particles in the injector part until 135 MeV, including 3D space charge force. The output particles from IMPACT-T are smoothed and increased to 12 x 10{sup 6} to reduce high-frequency numerical noise for subsequent ELEGANT simulations, which include linear and nonlinear transport effects, a 1D transient model of CSR, and longitudinal space charge effects, as well as geometric and resistive wake fields in the accelerator. In GENESIS part, the longitudinal wake field from undulator chamber and longitudinal space field are also included.« less