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Title: Effect of Samarium Doping on Electrodeposited CeO2 Thin Film

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902476
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physica Status Solidi (A); Journal Volume: 203; Journal Issue: 15, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SAMARIUM; THIN FILMS; SOLAR ENERGY; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; Basic Sciences

Citation Formats

Phok, S., and Bhattacharya, R. Effect of Samarium Doping on Electrodeposited CeO2 Thin Film. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1002/pssa.200622247.
Phok, S., & Bhattacharya, R. Effect of Samarium Doping on Electrodeposited CeO2 Thin Film. United States. doi:10.1002/pssa.200622247.
Phok, S., and Bhattacharya, R. Sun . "Effect of Samarium Doping on Electrodeposited CeO2 Thin Film". United States. doi:10.1002/pssa.200622247.
@article{osti_902476,
title = {Effect of Samarium Doping on Electrodeposited CeO2 Thin Film},
author = {Phok, S. and Bhattacharya, R.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1002/pssa.200622247},
journal = {Physica Status Solidi (A)},
number = 15, 2006,
volume = 203,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Scanning probe microscopy measurements show irreversible surface electrochemistry in Sm-doped CeO2 thin films, which depends on humidity, temperature and doping concentration. A systematic study by electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples with two different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in water adsorption and splitting with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve (FORC) method. Complementing our study with spectroscopic measurements by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy we find that watermore » incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity and conduction mechanism clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher mobility. Defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.« less
  • A systematic study by reversible and hysteretic electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples of Cerium oxide with different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in electrical conduction mechanism and related surface activity, such as water adsorption and dissociation with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the reversible hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve method. The measurements have been performed at much lower temperature ranges with respect to alternative measuring techniques. Complementing our study with hard x-raymore » photoemission spectroscopy and irreversible scanning probe measurements we find that water incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce 3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher electrical conductivity. The defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.« less
  • Characterization of a samarium thin film deposited on a stainless steel substrate using molecular electrodeposition was carried out using a Thermo Scientific K-Alpha X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. We studied two types of samarium electrodeposition samples, one as-deposited and one heated to 700 °C in an air flow. Survey scans include peaks coming from the stainless steel substrate, such as Fe and Cr. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) survey spectrum, Sm 3d, C 1s, and O 1s narrow scans are shown. It was determined that the heating process decomposed the deposited Sm acetate to Sm 2O 3 using XPS.