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Title: Vibrational Properties of GaP and GaP1-xNx under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 30 GPa

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902475
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physica Status Solidi (B); Journal Volume: 244; Journal Issue: 1, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; HYDROSTATICS; SOLAR ENERGY; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; Solar Energy - Photovoltaics

Citation Formats

Jackson, M. P., Halsall, M. P., Gungerich, M., Klar, P. J., Heimbrodt, W., and Geisz, J. F.. Vibrational Properties of GaP and GaP1-xNx under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 30 GPa. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1002/pssb.200672516.
Jackson, M. P., Halsall, M. P., Gungerich, M., Klar, P. J., Heimbrodt, W., & Geisz, J. F.. Vibrational Properties of GaP and GaP1-xNx under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 30 GPa. United States. doi:10.1002/pssb.200672516.
Jackson, M. P., Halsall, M. P., Gungerich, M., Klar, P. J., Heimbrodt, W., and Geisz, J. F.. Mon . "Vibrational Properties of GaP and GaP1-xNx under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 30 GPa". United States. doi:10.1002/pssb.200672516.
@article{osti_902475,
title = {Vibrational Properties of GaP and GaP1-xNx under Hydrostatic Pressures up to 30 GPa},
author = {Jackson, M. P. and Halsall, M. P. and Gungerich, M. and Klar, P. J. and Heimbrodt, W. and Geisz, J. F.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1002/pssb.200672516},
journal = {Physica Status Solidi (B)},
number = 1, 2007,
volume = 244,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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