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Title: Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project

Abstract

The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (“Indian Reorganization Act”). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lower Brule Sioux Tribe
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902428
Report Number(s):
LBST Wind-Hydro Final Report
TRN: US200719%%106
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-03GO13024
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; AMERICAN INDIANS; DAMS; MISSOURI RIVER; LOW-HEAD HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES

Citation Formats

Shawn A. LaRoche, Tracey LeBeau, and Innovation Investments, LLC. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/902428.
Shawn A. LaRoche, Tracey LeBeau, & Innovation Investments, LLC. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project. United States. doi:10.2172/902428.
Shawn A. LaRoche, Tracey LeBeau, and Innovation Investments, LLC. Fri . "Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project". United States. doi:10.2172/902428. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902428.
@article{osti_902428,
title = {Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project},
author = {Shawn A. LaRoche and Tracey LeBeau and Innovation Investments, LLC},
abstractNote = {The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (“Indian Reorganization Act”). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.},
doi = {10.2172/902428},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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