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Title: Multi-Gas Forcing Stabilization with the MiniCAM

Abstract

This paper examines the role of climate forcing agents other than carbon dioxide using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. Non-CO2 greenhouse gases are particularly important through the middle of the 21st century. The addition of non-CO2 greenhouse gases abatement options significantly reduces mitigation costs in the first half of the century as compared to a case where only CO2 abatement options are pursued. Non-CO2 greenhouse gas forcing is dominated by methane and tropospheric ozone. Assumptions about the prevalence of methane recovery and local air pollution controls are a critical determinant of reference forcing from these two gases. While the influence of aerosols are small by the end of the century, there is a significant interaction between a climate policy and aerosol cooling near mid-century such that global-mean climate change to 2050 is practically unaffected by mitigation policy.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902407
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-42552
400408000; TRN: US200717%%292
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Energy Journal, (Special Issue):373-391
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; AEROSOLS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATES; GASES; GREENHOUSE GASES; METHANE; MITIGATION; OZONE; STABILIZATION

Citation Formats

Smith, Steven J., and Wigley, T. M.. Multi-Gas Forcing Stabilization with the MiniCAM. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-19.
Smith, Steven J., & Wigley, T. M.. Multi-Gas Forcing Stabilization with the MiniCAM. United States. doi:10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-19.
Smith, Steven J., and Wigley, T. M.. Thu . "Multi-Gas Forcing Stabilization with the MiniCAM". United States. doi:10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-19.
@article{osti_902407,
title = {Multi-Gas Forcing Stabilization with the MiniCAM},
author = {Smith, Steven J. and Wigley, T. M.},
abstractNote = {This paper examines the role of climate forcing agents other than carbon dioxide using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. Non-CO2 greenhouse gases are particularly important through the middle of the 21st century. The addition of non-CO2 greenhouse gases abatement options significantly reduces mitigation costs in the first half of the century as compared to a case where only CO2 abatement options are pursued. Non-CO2 greenhouse gas forcing is dominated by methane and tropospheric ozone. Assumptions about the prevalence of methane recovery and local air pollution controls are a critical determinant of reference forcing from these two gases. While the influence of aerosols are small by the end of the century, there is a significant interaction between a climate policy and aerosol cooling near mid-century such that global-mean climate change to 2050 is practically unaffected by mitigation policy.},
doi = {10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-19},
journal = {The Energy Journal, (Special Issue):373-391},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Thu Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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