skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.

Abstract

This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4)more » a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these approximations on the predictions is not well understood because of the detail and complexity in land and subsurface processes and the need for computational efficiency. However, theoretical and experimental data suggest that these interactions may have a profound impact upon hydrologic and climatic budgets and weather predictions. Conversely, land-surface and groundwater models are typically applied on smaller domains (< 10 km in scale) to analyze runoff, streamflow, infiltration, evapotranspiration behavior, but are still influenced in many ways by couplings with the atmosphere (as in precipitation and temperature). Atmospheric inputs to these classes of models are typically represented as simplified ''upper'' boundary conditions, derived, in part, from coarse observations, uncoupled simulations, or other idealized simplifications. In this project, we developed a framework to couple these models by developing a new land-surface/subsurface model and coupling it to a regional climate model at the same temporal and spatial scales. We focused the coupling to examine the role of important mass and energy couplings between these models as a means to understand the difference between traditional and detailed approaches to this interconnection. From this understanding of these interconnections, we were able to determine to what extent these connections need to be abstracted or preserved in modeling atmospheric, land-surface and groundwater interactions. We have found a strong connection between groundwater dynamics (i.e. aquifer storage) and energy fluxes at the land surface and in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). The following papers outline this connection theoretically, demonstrate it with coupled modeling and propose strategies for better observing it in real settings.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902346
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-228343
TRN: US200717%%549
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; APPROXIMATIONS; AQUIFERS; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; BOUNDARY LAYERS; CLIMATE MODELS; CLIMATES; EFFICIENCY; FLOW MODELS; FORECASTING; PRECIPITATION; RUNOFF; SENSITIVITY; STORAGE; VIABILITY; WATERSHEDS; WEATHER

Citation Formats

Maxwell, R, Kollet, S, Chow, F, Granvold, P, and Duan, Q. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/902346.
Maxwell, R, Kollet, S, Chow, F, Granvold, P, & Duan, Q. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.. United States. doi:10.2172/902346.
Maxwell, R, Kollet, S, Chow, F, Granvold, P, and Duan, Q. Fri . "A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.". United States. doi:10.2172/902346. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902346.
@article{osti_902346,
title = {A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.},
author = {Maxwell, R and Kollet, S and Chow, F and Granvold, P and Duan, Q},
abstractNote = {This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4) a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these approximations on the predictions is not well understood because of the detail and complexity in land and subsurface processes and the need for computational efficiency. However, theoretical and experimental data suggest that these interactions may have a profound impact upon hydrologic and climatic budgets and weather predictions. Conversely, land-surface and groundwater models are typically applied on smaller domains (< 10 km in scale) to analyze runoff, streamflow, infiltration, evapotranspiration behavior, but are still influenced in many ways by couplings with the atmosphere (as in precipitation and temperature). Atmospheric inputs to these classes of models are typically represented as simplified ''upper'' boundary conditions, derived, in part, from coarse observations, uncoupled simulations, or other idealized simplifications. In this project, we developed a framework to couple these models by developing a new land-surface/subsurface model and coupling it to a regional climate model at the same temporal and spatial scales. We focused the coupling to examine the role of important mass and energy couplings between these models as a means to understand the difference between traditional and detailed approaches to this interconnection. From this understanding of these interconnections, we were able to determine to what extent these connections need to be abstracted or preserved in modeling atmospheric, land-surface and groundwater interactions. We have found a strong connection between groundwater dynamics (i.e. aquifer storage) and energy fluxes at the land surface and in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). The following papers outline this connection theoretically, demonstrate it with coupled modeling and propose strategies for better observing it in real settings.},
doi = {10.2172/902346},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a potential repository for transuranic wastes generated by defense programs of the US Department of Energy. The repository site is located 42 km east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico in a thick, Permian-age deposit of bedded salt. One consideration in evaluating the performance of the repository is that a future society might inadvertently penetrate the repository with one or more drill holes. Given certain circumstances, these holes could provide a pathway for contaminated brine to move upward into relatively permeable strata located above the bedded salt. There is concern that flowingmore » groundwater could then transport radionuclides laterally to the sub-surface portion of the accessible environment, currently defined by the disposal regulations as the region more than 5 kilometers from the radioactive waste. The simulations presented here are part of a numerical modeling study of the possible impact that a change in climate over the next 10,000 years could have on the pattern of groundwater flow and, consequently, on the migration of radionuclides in strata overlying the repository.« less
  • The objective of this report is to document the methodology used to calculate the three hydro-geomorphic indices: C Index, Nhot spot, and Interflow Contributing Area (IFC Area). These indices were applied in the Upper Four Mile Creek Watershed in order to better understand the potential mechanisms controlling retention time, path lengths, and potential for nutrient and solute metabolism and exchange associated with the geomorphic configurations of the upland contributing areas, groundwater, the riparian zone, and stream channels.
  • This is the final report summarizing the results of activities conducted in support of this project. It includes references to published material directly associated with this study.
  • RECOVERY is a PC-based screening-level model to assess the impact of contaminated bottom sediments on surface waters. The analysis is limited to organic contaminants with the assumption that the water column is well mixed. The contaminant is assumed to follow linear, reversible, equilibrium sorption and first-order decay kinetics. The physical representation of a system by RECOVERY consists of a well-mixed water column (i.e., zero- dimensional) underlain by a vertically stratified sediment column (i.e., one-dimensional). The sediment is well mixed horizontally, but segmented vertically into a well-mixed surface (active) layer and deep sediment. The deep sediment is segmented into contaminated andmore » clean sediment regions. Pathways incorporated in the RECOVERY model, in addition to sorption and decay, are volatilization, burial, resuspension, settling, advection, and pore-water diffusion. RECOVERY is designed for interactive implementation via a personal computer. The program allows the user to rapidly generate and analyze recovery scenarios for contaminated sediments. The software includes graphical displays and is self-documented. A description of the model, a confumation application, and a user`s guide are included in this report.« less
  • Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoilmore » bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.« less