skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design

Abstract

The objective of this brief report is to document the ESBWR pedestal wall finite element analyses that were performed as a quick turnaround effort in July 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and describe the assumptions and failure criteria used for these analyses [Ref 4]. The analyses described within are for the pedestal wall design that included an internal steel liner. The goal of the finite element analyses was to assist in determining the load carrying capacity of the ESBWR pedestal wall subjected to an impulsive pressure generated by a steam explosion.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902324
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-227386
TRN: US200717%%543
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CAPACITY; DESIGN; EXPLOSIONS; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; STEAM; STEELS

Citation Formats

Noble, C R. DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/902324.
Noble, C R. DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design. United States. doi:10.2172/902324.
Noble, C R. Thu . "DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design". United States. doi:10.2172/902324. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902324.
@article{osti_902324,
title = {DYNA3D Finite Element Analysis of Steam Explosion Loads on a Pedestal Wall Design},
author = {Noble, C R},
abstractNote = {The objective of this brief report is to document the ESBWR pedestal wall finite element analyses that were performed as a quick turnaround effort in July 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and describe the assumptions and failure criteria used for these analyses [Ref 4]. The analyses described within are for the pedestal wall design that included an internal steel liner. The goal of the finite element analyses was to assist in determining the load carrying capacity of the ESBWR pedestal wall subjected to an impulsive pressure generated by a steam explosion.},
doi = {10.2172/902324},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • A computational model has been developed for calculating the loads and displacements on a pipe placed in a hole which is subsequently filled with soil. A composite soil-pipe finite element model which employs fundamental material constants in its formalism is derived. The shear modulus of the soil, and the coefficient of friction at the pipe are the important constants to be specified. The calculated loads on the pipe are in agreement with experimental data for layered and unlayered stemming designs. As a result more economical designs of the pipe string can be realized.
  • This study was intended to contribute to the development of more rational practical methods for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of structures which are subjected to transient and impact loads. Application to the structural/operational safety of nuclear power plants is considered. The use of higher-order assumed-displacement finite elements (FE) is investigated to seek more efficient and accurate strain predictions; these studies were carried out for 2-d structural deformations typical of beams and curved rings to minimize cost and labor, using various approximations to the nonlinear strain-displacement relations since large deflections and rotations need to be taken into account.more » Predictions are made for these various FE models for impulsively-loaded beams and a free initially-circular ring, for which high quality experimental measurements of strains and deflections are available. Comparisons of measured with predicted transient strain and final deformation of a thin aluminum beam with both ends clamped and impacted at midspan by a 1-inch diameter steel sphere show very good agreement.« less
  • The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation.more » Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.« less
  • This report is the User Manual for the 1991 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as an interim User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictionalmore » sliding and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems. 73 refs., 49 figs.« less
  • This report is the User Manual for the 1993 version of DYNA3D, and also serves as a User Guide. DYNA3D is a nonlinear, explicit, finite element code for analyzing the transient dynamic response of three-dimensional solids and structures. The code is fully vectorized and is available on several computer platforms. DYNA3D includes solid, shell, beam, and truss elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many material models are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects, and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional slidingmore » and single surface contact. Rigid materials provide added modeling flexibility. A material model driver with interactive graphics display is incorporated into DYNA3D to permit accurate modeling of complex material response based on experimental data. Along with the DYNA3D Example Problem Manual, this document provides the information necessary to apply DYNA3D to solve a wide range of engineering analysis problems.« less