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Title: Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms

Abstract

As part of its own defense mechanism, most bacteria have developed an innate ability to enable toxic secretion to ward off potential predators or invaders. However, this naturally occurring process has been abused since over production of the bacteria's toxin molecules could render them as potential bioweapons. As these processes (also known as ''black biology'') can be clandestinely performed in a laboratory, the threat of inflicting enormous potential damage to a nation's security and economy is invariably clear and present. Thus, efficient detection of these biothreat agents in a timely and accurate manner is highly desirable. A wealth of publications describing various pathogen immuno-sensing advances has appeared over the last few years, and it is not the intent of this review article to detail each reported approach. Instead, we aim to survey a few recent highlights in hopes of providing the reader an overall sense of the breath of these sensing systems and platforms. Antigen targets are diverse and complex as they encompass proteins, whole viruses, and bacterial spores. The signaling processes for these reported immunoassays are usually based on colorimetric, optical, or electrochemical changes. Of equal interest is the type of platform in which the immunoassay can be performed.more » A few platforms suitable for pathogen detection are described.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902317
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-227771
TRN: US200717%%251
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Analyst, vol. 132, no. 2, March 1, 2007, pp. 187-191; Journal Volume: 132; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ANTIGENS; BACTERIA; BACTERIAL SPORES; BIOLOGY; BREATH; DETECTION; IMMUNOASSAY; PATHOGENS; PRODUCTION; PROTEINS; SECRETION; SECURITY; TARGETS; TOXINS; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Fischer, N, Tarasow, T, and Tok, J B. Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1039/b615477h.
Fischer, N, Tarasow, T, & Tok, J B. Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms. United States. doi:10.1039/b615477h.
Fischer, N, Tarasow, T, and Tok, J B. Tue . "Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms". United States. doi:10.1039/b615477h. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902317.
@article{osti_902317,
title = {Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms},
author = {Fischer, N and Tarasow, T and Tok, J B},
abstractNote = {As part of its own defense mechanism, most bacteria have developed an innate ability to enable toxic secretion to ward off potential predators or invaders. However, this naturally occurring process has been abused since over production of the bacteria's toxin molecules could render them as potential bioweapons. As these processes (also known as ''black biology'') can be clandestinely performed in a laboratory, the threat of inflicting enormous potential damage to a nation's security and economy is invariably clear and present. Thus, efficient detection of these biothreat agents in a timely and accurate manner is highly desirable. A wealth of publications describing various pathogen immuno-sensing advances has appeared over the last few years, and it is not the intent of this review article to detail each reported approach. Instead, we aim to survey a few recent highlights in hopes of providing the reader an overall sense of the breath of these sensing systems and platforms. Antigen targets are diverse and complex as they encompass proteins, whole viruses, and bacterial spores. The signaling processes for these reported immunoassays are usually based on colorimetric, optical, or electrochemical changes. Of equal interest is the type of platform in which the immunoassay can be performed. A few platforms suitable for pathogen detection are described.},
doi = {10.1039/b615477h},
journal = {The Analyst, vol. 132, no. 2, March 1, 2007, pp. 187-191},
number = 2,
volume = 132,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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