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Title: International perceptions of US nuclear policy.

Abstract

The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Georgetown Universtiy, Washington, DC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902206
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0903
TRN: US0702896
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; USA; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; CHINA; IRAN; PAKISTAN; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS; ATTITUDES; Nuclear weapons-Government policy; Germany.; Perception.; Nuclear weapons; China.; Iran.; Social perception.; Risk perception.; Nuclear weapons-Government policy.; Pakistan-Public opinion.

Citation Formats

Stanley, Elizabeth A. International perceptions of US nuclear policy.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/902206.
Stanley, Elizabeth A. International perceptions of US nuclear policy.. United States. doi:10.2172/902206.
Stanley, Elizabeth A. Wed . "International perceptions of US nuclear policy.". United States. doi:10.2172/902206. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902206.
@article{osti_902206,
title = {International perceptions of US nuclear policy.},
author = {Stanley, Elizabeth A.},
abstractNote = {The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.},
doi = {10.2172/902206},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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