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Title: Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint

Abstract

Over the next several decades, a profound transformation of the global energy enterprise will occur driven largely by population growth and economic development. How this growing demand for energy is met poses one of the most complex and challenging issues of our time. The current national energy dialogue reflects the challenge in simultaneously considering the social, political, economic, and technical issues as the energy system is defined, technical targets are established, and programs and investments are implemented to meet those technical targets. This paper examines the general concepts and options for meeting this challenge.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902169
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-600-41404
TRN: US200719%%597
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: To be presented at the International Conference on System of Systems Engineering; 16-18 April 2007; San Antonio, Texas
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; ENERGY SYSTEMS; TARGETS; TRANSFORMATIONS; NREL; BOBI GARRETT; INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS; INFRASTRUCTURE; GLOBAL DEMAND; SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS; SYSTEM ENGINEERING; TRANSPORTATION; ENERGY SECURITY; ELECTRICITY; SYSTEM MANAGEMENT; Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Energy Analysis

Citation Formats

Garrett, B. Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/SYSOSE.2007.4304315.
Garrett, B. Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint. United States. doi:10.1109/SYSOSE.2007.4304315.
Garrett, B. Sun . "Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint". United States. doi:10.1109/SYSOSE.2007.4304315. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902169.
@article{osti_902169,
title = {Evolving the Nation's Energy Infrastructure: A Challenging System Issue for the Twenty-First Century; Preprint},
author = {Garrett, B.},
abstractNote = {Over the next several decades, a profound transformation of the global energy enterprise will occur driven largely by population growth and economic development. How this growing demand for energy is met poses one of the most complex and challenging issues of our time. The current national energy dialogue reflects the challenge in simultaneously considering the social, political, economic, and technical issues as the energy system is defined, technical targets are established, and programs and investments are implemented to meet those technical targets. This paper examines the general concepts and options for meeting this challenge.},
doi = {10.1109/SYSOSE.2007.4304315},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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