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Title: Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities

Abstract

In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve theperformance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF)cavities is discussed.The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavitiesis recognized as an enabling technology toretain a veryhigh cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and tosignificantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unitlength(Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties ofNb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in theliterature are, however, mainly related to improvements in currentcarrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available forthe Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevantdata, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown howthis already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledgeis highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner statespecific research.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research. Office of High Energy Physics
OSTI Identifier:
902144
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62140
R&D Project: Z5MNEW; BnR: KA1502010; TRN: US0702796
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The International Workshop on: Thin Films and newideas for pushing the limits of RF superconductivity, Legnaro NationalLabs, Legnaro, Italy, October 9-12, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36; 43; 75; CAPACITY; CAVITIES; EFFICIENCY; PERFORMANCE; QUALITY FACTOR; SUPERCONDUCTIVITY; THIN FILMS; niobium-tin radiofrequency cavities

Citation Formats

Godeke, A. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Godeke, A. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities. United States.
Godeke, A. Mon . "Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902144.
@article{osti_902144,
title = {Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities},
author = {Godeke, A.},
abstractNote = {In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve theperformance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF)cavities is discussed.The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavitiesis recognized as an enabling technology toretain a veryhigh cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and tosignificantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unitlength(Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties ofNb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in theliterature are, however, mainly related to improvements in currentcarrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available forthe Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevantdata, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown howthis already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledgeis highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner statespecific research.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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