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Title: III-V Nitride Epilayers for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: GaPN and GaAsPN

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902092
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry B; Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 50, 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; NITRIDES; WATER; HYDROGEN; Hydrogen

Citation Formats

Deutsch, T. G., Koval, C. A., and Turner, J. A. III-V Nitride Epilayers for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: GaPN and GaAsPN. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/jp0652805.
Deutsch, T. G., Koval, C. A., & Turner, J. A. III-V Nitride Epilayers for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: GaPN and GaAsPN. United States. doi:10.1021/jp0652805.
Deutsch, T. G., Koval, C. A., and Turner, J. A. Sun . "III-V Nitride Epilayers for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: GaPN and GaAsPN". United States. doi:10.1021/jp0652805.
@article{osti_902092,
title = {III-V Nitride Epilayers for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting: GaPN and GaAsPN},
author = {Deutsch, T. G. and Koval, C. A. and Turner, J. A.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1021/jp0652805},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry B},
number = 50, 2006,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Energy storage is a key challenge in solar-driven renewable energy conversion. We promote a photochemical diode based on dilute nitride GaPN grown lattice-matched on Si(100), which could reach both high photovoltaic efficiencies and evolve hydrogen directly without external bias. Homoepitaxial GaP(100) surface preparation was shown to have a significant impact on the semiconductor-water interface formation. Here, we grow a thin, pseudomorphic GaP nucleation buffer on almost single-domain Si(100) prior to GaPN growth and compare the GaP{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02}/Si(100) surface preparation to established P- and Ga-rich surfaces of GaP/Si(100). We apply reflection anisotropy spectroscopy to study the surface preparation of GaP{submore » 0.98}N{sub 0.02} in situ in vapor phase epitaxy ambient and benchmark the signals to low energy electron diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. While the preparation of the Ga-rich surface is hardly influenced by the presence of the nitrogen precursor 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), we find that stabilization with UDMH after growth hinders well-defined formation of the V-rich GaP{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02}/Si(100) surface. Additional features in the reflection anisotropy spectra are suggested to be related to nitrogen incorporation in the GaP bulk.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Strain in thin layers of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) grown InAs on GaAs(001) was characterized by both Raman spectroscopy and double crystal x-ray diffraction (DCD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of Raman spectroscopy as a method of strain determination and compare it to DCD. Recent results of Burns et al., for In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As proved that Raman spectroscopy could be an important in situ analysis method for MBE (G. Burns, C. R. Wie, F. H. Dacol, G. D. Pettit, Appl. Phys. Lett. 51, 1919 (1987)). We find that Raman spectroscopy has several advantages over DCD.more » Raman data samples the stress in a much thinner volume than DCD, allowing one to determine when a surface layer of the thin film is no longer under stress. Films that are highly lattice mismatched with the substrate have a large number of defects at the substrate/epilayer interface. Raman analysis determines straain in a more defect free layer of these films when the layer thickness is greater than t/sub c/, the critical thickness. DCD samples an average strain over the entire thickness of most semiconductor films. There are several disadvantages in the use of Raman spectroscopy as a strain analysis method. We found that the materials parameters of InAs required to calculate the strain from the shift in the optical phonon energy of the epilayer were not accurately known. Quantitative strain determination by Raman spectroscopy depends on accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials of InAs and other III--V compounds of interest. Also, DCD is capable of determining much smaller strains than Raman spectroscopy.« less