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Title: Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources

Abstract

This project focuses on the development of electrical models for small (1-MW) distributed resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901959
Report Number(s):
NREL/SR-581-41109
XAT-5-55150-01; TRN: US200719%%481
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Work performed by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; VALIDATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; POWER RANGE 01-10 MW; DISPERSED STORAGE AND GENERATION; POWER GENERATION; DISTRIBUTED ENERGY; DISTRIBUTED RESOURCES; DE; DR; MODELS; MODELING; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; NREL; Distributed Energy Resources

Citation Formats

Simoes, M. G., Palle, B., Chakraborty, S., and Uriarte, C. Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/901959.
Simoes, M. G., Palle, B., Chakraborty, S., & Uriarte, C. Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources. United States. doi:10.2172/901959.
Simoes, M. G., Palle, B., Chakraborty, S., and Uriarte, C. Sun . "Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources". United States. doi:10.2172/901959. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901959.
@article{osti_901959,
title = {Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources},
author = {Simoes, M. G. and Palle, B. and Chakraborty, S. and Uriarte, C.},
abstractNote = {This project focuses on the development of electrical models for small (1-MW) distributed resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility.},
doi = {10.2172/901959},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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