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Title: WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY

Abstract

The introduction of wireless technology into a government site where nuclear material is processed and stored brings new meaning to the term ''harsh environment''. At SRNL, we are attempting to address not only the harsh RF and harsh physical environment common to industrial facilities, but also the ''harsh'' regulatory environment necessitated by the nature of the business at our site. We will discuss our concepts, processes, and expected outcomes in our attempts to surmount the roadblocks and reap the benefits of wireless in our ''factory''.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901919
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00155
TRN: US0702712
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ISA 53rd International Instrumentation Symposium
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS; RELIABILITY

Citation Formats

Shull, D, and Joe Cordaro, J. WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Shull, D, & Joe Cordaro, J. WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY. United States.
Shull, D, and Joe Cordaro, J. Wed . "WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901919.
@article{osti_901919,
title = {WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY},
author = {Shull, D and Joe Cordaro, J},
abstractNote = {The introduction of wireless technology into a government site where nuclear material is processed and stored brings new meaning to the term ''harsh environment''. At SRNL, we are attempting to address not only the harsh RF and harsh physical environment common to industrial facilities, but also the ''harsh'' regulatory environment necessitated by the nature of the business at our site. We will discuss our concepts, processes, and expected outcomes in our attempts to surmount the roadblocks and reap the benefits of wireless in our ''factory''.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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