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Title: Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint

Abstract

This paper describes how the Systems Integration Office is assisting the Department of Energy's Biomass Program by using systems engineering processes, practices and tools to guide decisions and achieve goals.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901866
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-150-41406
TRN: US200715%%90
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Related Information: To be presented at the 2007 International Conference on System of Systems Engineering: SOSE in Service of Energy and Security, 16-18 April 2007, San Antonio, Texas
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; BIOMASS; US DOE; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SYSTEMS ANALYSIS; BIOFUELS; BIOMASS-TO-BIOFUELS SUPPLY; ENERGY SYSTEM DYNAMICS MODELING; STAGE GATE MANAGEMENT; SYSTEMS ENGINEERING; Hydrogen

Citation Formats

Riley, C., Wooley, R., and Sandor, D. Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Riley, C., Wooley, R., & Sandor, D. Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint. United States.
Riley, C., Wooley, R., and Sandor, D. Thu . "Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901866.
@article{osti_901866,
title = {Implementing Systems Engineering in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program: Preprint},
author = {Riley, C. and Wooley, R. and Sandor, D.},
abstractNote = {This paper describes how the Systems Integration Office is assisting the Department of Energy's Biomass Program by using systems engineering processes, practices and tools to guide decisions and achieve goals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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