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Title: Modeling of thermally-driven transport in interior spaces for applications to zonal mixing models.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
 [1]; ;
  1. (University of California, Bekeley, CA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901721
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0561C
TRN: US200715%%40
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the International Heat Transfer Conference 13 held August 13-18, 2006 in Sidney, Australia.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; HEAT TRANSFER; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; MIXING

Citation Formats

Greif, R., Evans, Gregory Herbert, and Winters, William S.. Modeling of thermally-driven transport in interior spaces for applications to zonal mixing models.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Greif, R., Evans, Gregory Herbert, & Winters, William S.. Modeling of thermally-driven transport in interior spaces for applications to zonal mixing models.. United States.
Greif, R., Evans, Gregory Herbert, and Winters, William S.. Sun . "Modeling of thermally-driven transport in interior spaces for applications to zonal mixing models.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_901721,
title = {Modeling of thermally-driven transport in interior spaces for applications to zonal mixing models.},
author = {Greif, R. and Evans, Gregory Herbert and Winters, William S.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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