skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

Abstract

California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and themore » DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency andRenewable Energy.Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for TechnologyDevelopment. Office of the Basic Technologies Program; Pacific Gas andElectric, Calilifornia Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), Universityof California CIEE/PG&E Contract PGZ-0501
OSTI Identifier:
901672
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59351
R&D Project: E21447; BnR: 600303000; TRN: US200716%%409
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32; AUTOMATION; CALIFORNIA; ELECTRICITY; FIELD TESTS; IMPLEMENTATION; MARKET; OCCUPANTS; PRICES

Citation Formats

Piette, Mary Ann, Watson, David, Motegi, Naoya, Kiliccote, Sila, and Xu, Peng. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/901672.
Piette, Mary Ann, Watson, David, Motegi, Naoya, Kiliccote, Sila, & Xu, Peng. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results. United States. doi:10.2172/901672.
Piette, Mary Ann, Watson, David, Motegi, Naoya, Kiliccote, Sila, and Xu, Peng. Thu . "Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results". United States. doi:10.2172/901672. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901672.
@article{osti_901672,
title = {Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results},
author = {Piette, Mary Ann and Watson, David and Motegi, Naoya and Kiliccote, Sila and Xu, Peng},
abstractNote = {California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.},
doi = {10.2172/901672},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: