skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Final Report of MBX experiment

Abstract

The MBX experiment was built during the grant period. Details can be found in publications about MBX experiment. We created a low density plasma in a mirror configuration and rotated it at supersonic speeds in the theta direction. Under these conditions the plasma presents a high asymmetry in the current, plasma potential and consequently rotation with the voltage applied. We developed a two fluid model to describe the measurements based on a magnetofluid states ansatz. We also observed bistable and multiple states predicted by the two fluid model.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER)
OSTI Identifier:
901616
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/54697-1
TRN: US0703225
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-03ER54697
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ASYMMETRY; CONFIGURATION; MIRRORS; PLASMA; PLASMA POTENTIAL; ROTATION; Plasma, Mirror, Plasma flow, rotation

Citation Formats

Bengtson, Roger D, and Valanju, Prashant. Final Report of MBX experiment. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/901616.
Bengtson, Roger D, & Valanju, Prashant. Final Report of MBX experiment. United States. doi:10.2172/901616.
Bengtson, Roger D, and Valanju, Prashant. Mon . "Final Report of MBX experiment". United States. doi:10.2172/901616. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901616.
@article{osti_901616,
title = {Final Report of MBX experiment},
author = {Bengtson, Roger D and Valanju, Prashant},
abstractNote = {The MBX experiment was built during the grant period. Details can be found in publications about MBX experiment. We created a low density plasma in a mirror configuration and rotated it at supersonic speeds in the theta direction. Under these conditions the plasma presents a high asymmetry in the current, plasma potential and consequently rotation with the voltage applied. We developed a two fluid model to describe the measurements based on a magnetofluid states ansatz. We also observed bistable and multiple states predicted by the two fluid model.},
doi = {10.2172/901616},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The LMFRE is described briefly. It is a graphite moderated, graphite reflected reactor, using as fuel a circulating solution of U/sup 235/ in liquid bismuth, which transports heat to an external heat rejection system. The critical experiment program is outlined. The basic information to be obtained is the critical size and concentration of a series of assemblies in which the uranium concentration snd reflector thickness are varied. Control rod experiments are planned, as well as test hole effects, and effects of fuel in the reflectors and plenums. The critical sssembly is constructed in two halves, one each on a movablemore » and stationary table. The core is constucted of several thousand bars of bismuth and graphite, and fullyenriched U-Al alloy strips, held together in graphite channels. The reflector is built of large blocks of graphite. The table drive system and supporting structure, control rods and drives, neutron source and drive, and instrumentation are discussed. The storage and assembling of fuel, approach to critical, and operating procedures conform to standard practice. At least two large safety rods are cocked in each assembly for fast acting safety. Ultimate shutdown is provided by table separation. A fundamental reactivity addition rate limitation is 0.0005/sec, which applies to both control rod and table movement. Various accidents are discussed. The maximum credible accident is defined in terms of a loading error combined with failures in the safety circuits and thble drive mechanism and leads to a reactivity addition of 0.0015/sec up to 2% total excess reactivity. The ultimate shutdown mechanism is a combination of fuel boiling and graphite heating. Over a range of step reactivity additions up to 2% and ramps up to 2%sec, and for various conditions of heat transfer, the maximum possible energy release to terminate the excursion is l7OMw-sec. The environmental hazard due to 10% release of the fission product activity generated in the excursion is considered. The maximum dose to the nearest permanent resident, located 2500 ft from the laboratory, in no case represents a serious hazard. (auth)« less
  • This report describes the results of the SC-3 (High Energy Particle Spectrometer) and SC-8 (Energetic Ion Composition Experiment) instruments flown on the SCATHA (Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes) satellite, launched in January 1979 into a near geosynchronous orbit. The instruments measure electrons at energies of 0.05-5.0 MeV, protons of 1-100 MeV, and mass composition of ions in the range E/q=0.1-32 keV/e. Both instruments continue to be fully operational at this time. Principal results of the High Energy Particle Spectrometer have addressed radial profiles and energy spectra of energetic particles, the role of energetic particles in the charging and discharging ofmore » spacecraft dielectrics, the behavior of trapped electrons at flux levels near the Kennel-Petchek trapping limit, and the precipitation of energetic electrons into the ionosphere. The Energetic Ion Composition Experiment has provided the first ion composition data with routine pitch-angle coverage in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit. The advances resulting from this instrument can be grouped into four categories: (1) plasma injection and transport, (2) detailed structure of near-geosynchronous plasma distributions, (3) interactions between hot plasmas and spacecraft, and (4) global understanding arising from the synthesis of individual results.« less
  • The ALE/GAGE project was designed to determine the global atmospheric lifetimes of the chlorofluorocarbons CCl3F and CCl2F2 (F-11 and F-12), which had been identified as the main gases that cause stratospheric ozone depletion. The experimental procedures also provided the concentrations of CH3CCl3, CCl4 and N2O. The extended role of the project was to evaluate the mass balances of these gases as well. Methylchloroform (CH3CCl3) serves as a tracer of average atmospheric OH concentrations and hence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and can also deplete the ozone layer. Measurements of these gasesmore » were taken with optimized instruments in the field at a frequency of about 1 sample/hr. Toward the end of the present project methane measurements were added to the program. The final report deals with the research of the Oregon Graduate Institute (OGI) as part of the ALE/GAGE program between 4/1/1988 and 1/31/1991. The report defines the scope of the OGI project, the approach, and the results.« less
  • A compilation of reports and scientific papers is presented for the following topics: (1) the lunar ionosphere; (2) electric potential of the lunar surface; (3) ion activity on the lunar nightside; (4) bow shock protons; (5) magnetosheath and magnetotail; (6) solar wind--neutral gas cloud interactions at the lunar surface; (7) penetrating solar particles; and (8) rocket exhaust products from Apollo missions. Descriptions and photographs of ion detecting equipment at the lunar sites of Apollo 12, 13, 14, and 15 are given. (GRA)