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Title: Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River

Abstract

This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; California Bay Delta Authority
OSTI Identifier:
901531
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62371
R&D Project: GNQUPGRADE; BnR: WN0219060; TRN: US200714%%245
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; DESIGN; DISSOLVED GASES; FORECASTING; IRRIGATION; MONITORING; OXYGEN; RIVERS; SIMULATION; WATER; WATER QUALITY; flow water quality monitoring TMDL modeling

Citation Formats

Quinn, Nigel W.T.. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/901531.
Quinn, Nigel W.T.. Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River. United States. doi:10.2172/901531.
Quinn, Nigel W.T.. 2007. "Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River". United States. doi:10.2172/901531. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901531.
@article{osti_901531,
title = {Design and installation of continuous flow and water qualitymonitoring stations to improve water quality forecasting in the lower SanJoaquin River},
author = {Quinn, Nigel W.T.},
abstractNote = {This project deliverable describes a number ofstate-of-the-art, telemetered, flow and water quality monitoring stationsthat were designed, instrumented and installed in cooperation with localirrigation water districts to improve water quality simulation models ofthe lower San Joaquin River, California. This work supports amulti-disciplinary, multi-agency research endeavor to develop ascience-based Total Maximum Daily Load for dissolved oxygen in the SanJoaquin River and Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel.},
doi = {10.2172/901531},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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