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Title: How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services andSystems at NERSC, 2005-2006

Abstract

This is the sixth self-assessment of the systems andservices provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's National EnergyResearch Scientific Computing Center, describing many of the efforts ofthe NERSC staff to support advanced computing for scientific discovery.The report is organized along the 10 goals set by our staff and outlineshow we are working to meet those goals. Our staff applies experience andexpertise to provide world-class systems and unparalleled services forNERSC users. At the same time, members of our organization are leadingcontributors to advancing the field of high-performance computing throughconference presentations, published papers, collaborations withscientific researchers and through regular meetings with members ofsimilar institutions. In the fast-moving realm of high-performancecomputing, adopting the latest technology while reliably deliveringcritical resources can be a challenge, but we believe that thisself-assessment demonstrates that NERSC continues to excel on bothcounts.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research. Mathematical Information and ComputationalSciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
901528
Report Number(s):
LBNL-62117
R&D Project: KN6732; BnR: YN0100000; TRN: US200714%%155
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99; EVALUATION; US DOE; COMPUTERS; LABORATORIES; high performance scientific computing facility managementsupercomputer client service support

Citation Formats

Kramer, William T.C., and Hules, John. How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services andSystems at NERSC, 2005-2006. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/901528.
Kramer, William T.C., & Hules, John. How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services andSystems at NERSC, 2005-2006. United States. doi:10.2172/901528.
Kramer, William T.C., and Hules, John. Tue . "How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services andSystems at NERSC, 2005-2006". United States. doi:10.2172/901528. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901528.
@article{osti_901528,
title = {How Are We Doing? A Self-Assessment of the Quality of Services andSystems at NERSC, 2005-2006},
author = {Kramer, William T.C. and Hules, John},
abstractNote = {This is the sixth self-assessment of the systems andservices provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's National EnergyResearch Scientific Computing Center, describing many of the efforts ofthe NERSC staff to support advanced computing for scientific discovery.The report is organized along the 10 goals set by our staff and outlineshow we are working to meet those goals. Our staff applies experience andexpertise to provide world-class systems and unparalleled services forNERSC users. At the same time, members of our organization are leadingcontributors to advancing the field of high-performance computing throughconference presentations, published papers, collaborations withscientific researchers and through regular meetings with members ofsimilar institutions. In the fast-moving realm of high-performancecomputing, adopting the latest technology while reliably deliveringcritical resources can be a challenge, but we believe that thisself-assessment demonstrates that NERSC continues to excel on bothcounts.},
doi = {10.2172/901528},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Since its inception nearly 25 years ago, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center has provided its ever-expanding client base with the latest in scientific computing resources. A key element of NERSC`s successful operation is its ability to anticipate and meet the diverse needs of clients. In order to further this strong working relationship, NERSC staff and clients meet periodically via ERSUG to share views, offer training and identify problems and solutions. The success of NERSC is measured in large part by the quality of science produced by its clients. NERSC`s job is to give them the reliable tools theymore » need -- client support, software and access to computing resources. To ensure that those needs are being met, a set of 10 performance goals pertaining to NERSC systems and service has been established. The goals that have been set out cover the following areas: Reliable and timely service; Innovative assistance; Timely and accurate information; New technologies; Wise technology integration; Progress measurement; High-performance computing center Leadership; Technology transfer; Staff effectiveness; and Protected Infrastructure. This report, covering work from October 1996 through September 1997, has been produced to give NERSC clients, sponsors and staff a better idea of how NERSC is performing.« less
  • This fourth annual self-assessment of the systems and services provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center describes the efforts of the NERSC staff to support advanced computing for scientific discovery. Our staff applies experience and expertise to provide world-class systems and unparalleled services for NERSC users. At the same time, members of our organization are leading contributors to advancing the field of high-performance computing through conference presentations, published papers, collaborations with scientific researchers and through regular meetings with members of similar institutions. We believe that, by any measure, the results of our efforts underscoremore » NERSC's position as a global leader in scientific computing.« less
  • The NERSC staff continues to provide our user community with highly rated support services and with an unmatched availability of computing resources. Every year, an annual survey of users shows that the quality of services provided by NERSC gets better and better. In addition to this survey, NERSC has also established a series of related goals and annually assess our performance against them to ensure that our staff remains focused on meeting the needs of NERSC and advancing computational science in supporting DOE's mission areas. This report, the fifth in a series, describes how the NERSC staff is working tomore » achieve these goals and the overall objective of providing unparalleled systems and services to the scientific community.« less
  • This project was designed to provide technical assistance and project coordination to producers in Sherman County for on the ground water quality and riparian enhancement projects. This is accomplished utilizing the USDA Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in addition to other grant monies to translate the personnel funds in this project to on the ground projects. Two technicians and one watershed council coordinator are funded, either wholly or in part, by funds from this grant. The project area encompasses the whole of Sherman County which is bordered almost entirely by streams providing habitat or migration corridors for endangered fish speciesmore » including steelhead and Chinook salmon. Of those four streams that comprise Sherman County's boundaries, three are listed on the DEQ 303(d) list of water quality limited streams for exceeding summer temperature limits. Only one stream in the interior of Sherman County is 303(d) listed for temperatures, but is the largest watershed in the County. Temperatures in streams are directly affected by the amount of solar radiation allowed to reach the surface of the water. Practices designed to improve bank-side vegetation, such as the CREP program, will counteract the solar heating of those water quality listed streams, benefiting endangered stocks. CREP and water quality projects are promoted and coordinated with local landowners through locally-led watershed councils. Funding from BPA provides a portion of the salary for a watershed council coordinator who acts to disseminate water quality and USDA program information directly to landowners through watershed council activities. The watershed coordinator acts to educate landowners in water quality and riparian management issues and to secure funds for the implementation of on the ground water quality projects. Actual project implementation is carried out by the two technicians funded by this project. Technicians in Sherman County, in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, assist landowners in developing Resource Management Systems (RMS) that address resource concerns in a specified land unit. These RMS plans are developed using a nine step planning process that acts to balance natural resource issues with economic and social needs. Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human resource concerns are the core focus in developing a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of conservation activities in a given planning unit, while working within the guidelines set forth by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA), National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and other federal, state, and local laws. Implementation of this project has provided technical and implementation assistance for numerous on the ground projects, including 119 WASCBs, 74,591 feet of terraces, 3 spring developments, 24,839 feet of riparian or pasture cross fencing, 1,072 acres of direct seed trials, 14 landowners implementing 34 CREP contracts, and the development of 5 additional CREP contracts slated for enrollment at the beginning of FY07. Within the past contract year in Sherman County, 1898.3 acres of CREP have been enrolled protecting approximately 52 miles of riparian or intermittent stream channel habitat. In addition to the increase in on the ground projects, coordination and outreach to solicit conservation projects in Sherman County has increased due to the additional staffing provided by BPA funds. As a result there is an abundance of potential conservation projects for water quality and riparian management improvement. With the sustained availability of coordination and technical assistance provided through this grant, BPA personnel funds will translate to a much higher dollar figure applied on the ground. This project has been very successful in keeping up with the demand for conservation projects within Sherman County.« less