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Title: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study

Abstract

Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE. Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution,Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Permitting Sitingand Analysis Division
OSTI Identifier:
901520
Report Number(s):
LBNL-61498
R&D Project: 673126; BnR: TD5211000; TRN: US200714%%242
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY POLICY; MARKET; TARIFFS

Citation Formats

Goldman, Charles, Hopper, Nicole, Bharvirkar, Ranjit, Neenan,Bernie, and Cappers, Peter. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/901520.
Goldman, Charles, Hopper, Nicole, Bharvirkar, Ranjit, Neenan,Bernie, & Cappers, Peter. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study. United States. doi:10.2172/901520.
Goldman, Charles, Hopper, Nicole, Bharvirkar, Ranjit, Neenan,Bernie, and Cappers, Peter. Mon . "Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study". United States. doi:10.2172/901520. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901520.
@article{osti_901520,
title = {Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study},
author = {Goldman, Charles and Hopper, Nicole and Bharvirkar, Ranjit and Neenan,Bernie and Cappers, Peter},
abstractNote = {Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.},
doi = {10.2172/901520},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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