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Title: The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

Abstract

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901257
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-12123
TRN: US0702559
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Invited talk at 2006 Linear Accelerator Conference (LINAC 06), Knoxville, Tennessee, 21-25 Aug 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BRIGHTNESS; COMMISSIONING; COMPRESSORS; CONSTRUCTION; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; FEEDBACK; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; INSTABILITY; LIGHT SOURCES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; SATURATION; STABILITY; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER; Accelerators,ACCPHY, ACCSYS, INST, SYNCHRAD, XFEL

Citation Formats

Wu, Juhao, Emma, P., and /SLAC. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Wu, Juhao, Emma, P., & /SLAC. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator. United States.
Wu, Juhao, Emma, P., and /SLAC. Wed . "The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901257.
@article{osti_901257,
title = {The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator},
author = {Wu, Juhao and Emma, P. and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • The authors describe the possible use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful, short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Using the FEL principle, lasing is achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified-spontaneous-emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness electron RF gun with a photocathode, two electron bunch length compressors, the existing SLAC linac, beam diagnostics, and a long undulator combined with a FODO quadrupole focusing system. The RF gun, to be installed about 1 km from the end of the SLAC linac, would produce amore » single bunch of 6 x 10{sup 9} electrons with an invariant emittance of about 3 mm-mrad and a bunch length of about 500 {mu}m. That bunch is then accelerated to 100 MeV and compressed to a length of about 200 {mu}m. The main SLAC linac accelerates the bunch to 2 GeV were a second bunch compressor reduces the length to 30--40 {mu}m and produces a peak current of 2--3 kA. The bunch is then accelerated to 7--8 GeV and transported to a 50--70 m long undulator. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the undulator could operate at wavelengths down to 2 nm, producing about 10 GW peak power in sub-ps light pulses. At a linac repetition rate of 120 Hz, the average power is about 1 W. Linac operation at lower beam energies provides longer wavelength radiation. After the undulator, the beam is deposited in a dump. The LCLS light pulses are then distributed to multiple user stations using grazing incident mirrors. Length compression, emittance control, phase stability, FEL design criteria, and parameter tolerances are discussed. A demonstration experiment is also described which uses the SLAC linac and (possibly) the PALADIN undulator to study SASE to power saturation at wavelengths of 40--360 nm.« less
  • A linac configuration providing a low emittance high peak current electron beam is under study for a potential Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on the SLAC accelerator. The parameters of the final electron bunch are nearing the technological limits of present accelerators in both transverse and longitudinal phase space. In this note we describe a layout of the RF gun, linac, and bunch compressors to deliver the required bunch properties. We consider a bunch that is generated by an rf gun and accelerated to 7 GeV in 900 m of SLAC linac structure before it enters the wiggler. Wemore » assume that the rf gun generates a gaussian beam with an energy of 10 MeV, a population N = 6 {times} 10{sup 9}e{sup {minus}}, an rms length {sigma}{sub z} = 0.5 mm, an rms energy spread {sigma}{sub {delta}} = 0.2%, and normalized rms emittances {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x,y} = 3 mm-mrad. At the end of the linac, we require that the peak current {cflx I} {approx_gt} 2.5 kA and the peak-to-peak energy spread {Delta}{delta} {approx_lt} 0.2%. To obtain the required high peak current, we need to compress the bunch length by a factor greater than 10. In deciding at what position in the linac to compress we need to consider three issues: the longitudinal wakefield in the linac, this increases the beam`s energy spread and is harder to compensate with short bunches, the transverse wakefield and rf deflections in the linac, these increase the transverse emittance of the beam and are more severe for long bunches, and the effects of phase and current jitter which will change the bunch length and therefore the peak current of the beam. In this paper, we will describe how we compress the bunch to meet these three criteria. Then, we will briefly describe the bunch compressor optics and finally we will mention some details specific to the SLAC site.« less
  • We describe the use of the SLAC linac to drive a unique, powerful. short wavelength Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Operating as an FEL, lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a high peak current electron beam through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The main components are a high-brightness rf photocathode electron gun; pulse compressors; about 1/5 of the SLAC linac; and a long undulator with a FODO quadrupole focussing system. Using electrons below 8 GeV, the system would operate at wavelengths down to about 3 nm, producing {ge}10 GW peak power in sub-ps pulses.more » At a 120 Hz rate the average power is {approx} 1 W.« less
  • Linac-driven X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (e.g., Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs)), operating on the principle of single-pass saturation in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime typically require multi-GeV beam energies and undulator lengths in excess of tens of meters to attain sufficient gain in the 1{angstrom}--0.1{angstrom} range. In this parameter regime, the undulator structure must provide: (1) field amplitudes B{sub 0} in excess of 1T within periods of 4cm or less, (2) peak on-axis focusing gradients on the order of 30T/m, and (3) field quality in the 0.1%--0.3% range. In this paper the authors report on designs under consideration formore » a 4.5--1.5 {angstrom} LCLS based on superconducting (SC), hybrid/PM, and pulsed-Cu technologies.« less
  • In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at SLAC to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 A) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation in a minimal time include: (1) a peak current in the 7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of {lt}0.05%, and (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}[r-m], approximating the diffraction limit condition {epsilon} = {lambda} / 4{pi}, where lambda(m) is the output wavelength. Requirements on themore » insertion device include field error levels of 0.02% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 8 m/rad for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress has been made in developing individual components and beam processing techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to approx. 20 A, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 A LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas.« less