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Title: Molecular Structure of Water at Interfaces: Wetting at theNanometer Scale

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director. Office of Science. Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research. Office of Basic Energy Sciences. MaterialsSciences and Engineering Division; Generalitat de Catalunya, SpanishMinistry of Education
OSTI Identifier:
901221
Report Number(s):
LBNL-59206
Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2665; CHREAY; R&D Project: 517950; BnR: KC0203010; TRN: US200713%%104
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Reviews; Journal Volume: 106; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; WATER; INTERFACES; WETTABILITY; NANOSTRUCTURES

Citation Formats

Verdaguer, A., Sacha, G.M., Bluhm, H., and Salmeron, M. Molecular Structure of Water at Interfaces: Wetting at theNanometer Scale. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Verdaguer, A., Sacha, G.M., Bluhm, H., & Salmeron, M. Molecular Structure of Water at Interfaces: Wetting at theNanometer Scale. United States.
Verdaguer, A., Sacha, G.M., Bluhm, H., and Salmeron, M. Tue . "Molecular Structure of Water at Interfaces: Wetting at theNanometer Scale". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_901221,
title = {Molecular Structure of Water at Interfaces: Wetting at theNanometer Scale},
author = {Verdaguer, A. and Sacha, G.M. and Bluhm, H. and Salmeron, M.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {Chemical Reviews},
number = ,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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