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Title: THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products

Abstract

THERM is a state-of-the-art, Microsoft Windows{trademark}-based computer program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for use by building component manufacturers, engineers, educators, students, architects, and others interested in heat transfer. Using THERM, you can model two-dimensional heat-transfer effects in building components such as windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors; appliances; and other products where thermal bridges are of concern. THERM's heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product's energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity. THERM's two-dimensional conduction heat-transfer analysis is based on the finite-element method, which can model the complicated geometries of building products. The program's graphic interface allows you to draw cross sections of products or components to be analyzed. To create the cross sections, you can trace imported files in DXF or bitmap format, or input the geometry from known dimensions. Each cross section is represented by a combination of polygons. You define the material properties for each polygon and introduce the environmental conditions to which the component is exposed by defining the boundary conditions surrounding the cross section. Once the model is created, the remaining analysis (mesher and heat transfer) is automatic. Youmore » can view results from THERM in several forms, including U-factors, isotherms, heat-flux vectors, and local temperatures. This version of THERM includes several new technical and user interface features; the most significant is a radiation view-factor algorithm. This feature increases the accuracy of calculations in situations where you are analyzing non-planar surfaces that have different temperatures and exchange energy through radiation heat transfer. This heat-transfer mechanism is important in greenhouse windows, hollow cavities, and some aluminum frames. THERM is a module of the WINDOW+5 program under development by LBNL. WINDOW+5 is the next generation of the WINDOW software series and is being developed for the Microsoft Windows{trademark} operating environment. THERM's results can be used with WINDOW's center-of-glass optical and thermal models to determine total window product U-factors and Solar Heat Gain Coefficients. These values can be used, in turn, with the RESFEN program, which calculates total annual energy requirements in typical residences throughout the United States.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency andRenewable Energy
OSTI Identifier:
901210
Report Number(s):
LBL-37371-Rev.-2
TRN: US200713%%337
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14; ALUMINIUM; APPLIANCES; ARCHITECTS; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; COMPUTER CODES; CROSS SECTIONS; DOORS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ENGINEERS; HEAT FLUX; HEAT GAIN; HEAT TRANSFER; ISOTHERMS; MANUFACTURERS; RADIATIONS; ROOFS; THERMAL BRIDGES; VECTORS; WINDOWS

Citation Formats

Windows and Daylighting Group. THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/901210.
Windows and Daylighting Group. THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/901210
Windows and Daylighting Group. 1997. "THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/901210. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/901210.
@article{osti_901210,
title = {THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products},
author = {Windows and Daylighting Group},
abstractNote = {THERM is a state-of-the-art, Microsoft Windows{trademark}-based computer program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for use by building component manufacturers, engineers, educators, students, architects, and others interested in heat transfer. Using THERM, you can model two-dimensional heat-transfer effects in building components such as windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors; appliances; and other products where thermal bridges are of concern. THERM's heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product's energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity. THERM's two-dimensional conduction heat-transfer analysis is based on the finite-element method, which can model the complicated geometries of building products. The program's graphic interface allows you to draw cross sections of products or components to be analyzed. To create the cross sections, you can trace imported files in DXF or bitmap format, or input the geometry from known dimensions. Each cross section is represented by a combination of polygons. You define the material properties for each polygon and introduce the environmental conditions to which the component is exposed by defining the boundary conditions surrounding the cross section. Once the model is created, the remaining analysis (mesher and heat transfer) is automatic. You can view results from THERM in several forms, including U-factors, isotherms, heat-flux vectors, and local temperatures. This version of THERM includes several new technical and user interface features; the most significant is a radiation view-factor algorithm. This feature increases the accuracy of calculations in situations where you are analyzing non-planar surfaces that have different temperatures and exchange energy through radiation heat transfer. This heat-transfer mechanism is important in greenhouse windows, hollow cavities, and some aluminum frames. THERM is a module of the WINDOW+5 program under development by LBNL. WINDOW+5 is the next generation of the WINDOW software series and is being developed for the Microsoft Windows{trademark} operating environment. THERM's results can be used with WINDOW's center-of-glass optical and thermal models to determine total window product U-factors and Solar Heat Gain Coefficients. These values can be used, in turn, with the RESFEN program, which calculates total annual energy requirements in typical residences throughout the United States.},
doi = {10.2172/901210},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/901210}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}