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Title: FTIR Spectroscopy for Bacterial Spore Identification and Classification

Abstract

The ability to distinguish endospores from each other, from vegetative cells, and from background particles has been demonstrated by PNNL and several other laboratories using various analytical techniques such as MALDI and SIMS. Recent studies at PNNL using Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have shown the ability to characterize and discriminate bacterial spores and vegetative bacteria from each other, as well as from background interferents. In some cases it is even possible to determine the taxonomical identity of the species using FTIR. This effort has now grown to include multiple species of bacterial endospores, vegetative cells, and background materials. The present work reports on advances in being able to use FTIR, or IR in combination with other techniques, for rapid and reliable discrimination.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901188
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-51859
TRN: US200713%%87
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Chemical and Biological Sensors for Industrial and Environmental Monitoring II. Proceedings- SPIE the International Society for Optical Engineering, 6378:63780P, (10 pages)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BACTERIAL SPORES; CLASSIFICATION; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; BACTERIA; INFRARED SPECTRA; PERFORMANCE; endospores; FTIR; spectroscopy

Citation Formats

Valentine, Nancy B., Johnson, Timothy J., Su, Yin-Fong, and Forrester, Joel B.. FTIR Spectroscopy for Bacterial Spore Identification and Classification. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1117/12.686232.
Valentine, Nancy B., Johnson, Timothy J., Su, Yin-Fong, & Forrester, Joel B.. FTIR Spectroscopy for Bacterial Spore Identification and Classification. United States. doi:10.1117/12.686232.
Valentine, Nancy B., Johnson, Timothy J., Su, Yin-Fong, and Forrester, Joel B.. Sun . "FTIR Spectroscopy for Bacterial Spore Identification and Classification". United States. doi:10.1117/12.686232.
@article{osti_901188,
title = {FTIR Spectroscopy for Bacterial Spore Identification and Classification},
author = {Valentine, Nancy B. and Johnson, Timothy J. and Su, Yin-Fong and Forrester, Joel B.},
abstractNote = {The ability to distinguish endospores from each other, from vegetative cells, and from background particles has been demonstrated by PNNL and several other laboratories using various analytical techniques such as MALDI and SIMS. Recent studies at PNNL using Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with statistical analysis have shown the ability to characterize and discriminate bacterial spores and vegetative bacteria from each other, as well as from background interferents. In some cases it is even possible to determine the taxonomical identity of the species using FTIR. This effort has now grown to include multiple species of bacterial endospores, vegetative cells, and background materials. The present work reports on advances in being able to use FTIR, or IR in combination with other techniques, for rapid and reliable discrimination.},
doi = {10.1117/12.686232},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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