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Title: Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific

Abstract

Radiative heating of the atmosphere affects cloud evolution and atmospheric dynamics. The most direct means available for determining radiative heating profiles is to measure profiles of thermodynamic and cloud properties (temperature, humidity, liquid and ice water content) and use these profiles to calculate radiative fluxes. Obtaining accurate, high resolution profiles of these properties requires active remote sensing instruments. Instruments capable of making these measurements and the techniques for interpreting these measurements for meteorological applications have only recently become available. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates instruments including millimeter wavelength radars and microwave radiometers to measure cloud property distributions at sites around the world including three in the tropical western Pacific region. We have analyzed several months of ARM observations from Manus and Nauru to calculate time series of vertical cloud property profiles and associated radiative fluxes and heating rates. To test the validity of these radiative profiles, we have conducted closure tests that compare calculated radiative fluxes at the surface and top of atmosphere to measurements from the ARM sites and from geostationary satellite. The cloud and radiation profiles exhibit distinct vertical structure with strong boundary layer and cirrus features at both sites. Manus, which was much more convectivelymore » active than Nauru during the study period, also exhibits a mid-level cloud feature near the melting level. The two sites exhibit very different diurnal cycles. This data set will be an important tool for describing radiative processes in the tropics and assessing the simulation of these processes in dynamical models.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901170
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-50277
KP1205010; TRN: US200713%%77
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research. D. (Atmospheres), 112:D05201; Journal Volume: 112
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BOUNDARY LAYERS; CLOUDS; HEATING RATE; HUMIDITY; MELTING; NAURU; SOLAR RADIATION; RADIOMETERS; REMOTE SENSING; Radiative heating; atmosphere affects; cloud evolution; atmospheric dynamics

Citation Formats

Mather, Jim H., McFarlane, Sally A., Miller, Mark, and Johnson, Karen L. Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1029/2006JD007555.
Mather, Jim H., McFarlane, Sally A., Miller, Mark, & Johnson, Karen L. Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific. United States. doi:10.1029/2006JD007555.
Mather, Jim H., McFarlane, Sally A., Miller, Mark, and Johnson, Karen L. Thu . "Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific". United States. doi:10.1029/2006JD007555.
@article{osti_901170,
title = {Cloud Properties and Associated Radiative Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific},
author = {Mather, Jim H. and McFarlane, Sally A. and Miller, Mark and Johnson, Karen L.},
abstractNote = {Radiative heating of the atmosphere affects cloud evolution and atmospheric dynamics. The most direct means available for determining radiative heating profiles is to measure profiles of thermodynamic and cloud properties (temperature, humidity, liquid and ice water content) and use these profiles to calculate radiative fluxes. Obtaining accurate, high resolution profiles of these properties requires active remote sensing instruments. Instruments capable of making these measurements and the techniques for interpreting these measurements for meteorological applications have only recently become available. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates instruments including millimeter wavelength radars and microwave radiometers to measure cloud property distributions at sites around the world including three in the tropical western Pacific region. We have analyzed several months of ARM observations from Manus and Nauru to calculate time series of vertical cloud property profiles and associated radiative fluxes and heating rates. To test the validity of these radiative profiles, we have conducted closure tests that compare calculated radiative fluxes at the surface and top of atmosphere to measurements from the ARM sites and from geostationary satellite. The cloud and radiation profiles exhibit distinct vertical structure with strong boundary layer and cirrus features at both sites. Manus, which was much more convectively active than Nauru during the study period, also exhibits a mid-level cloud feature near the melting level. The two sites exhibit very different diurnal cycles. This data set will be an important tool for describing radiative processes in the tropics and assessing the simulation of these processes in dynamical models.},
doi = {10.1029/2006JD007555},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. D. (Atmospheres), 112:D05201},
number = ,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}